boots57

anyone past 50 on here?

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ryn2
3 hours ago, chandrakirti said:

Oh! I sooo identify with that one...

Same!

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michaeld
12 hours ago, Midland Tyke said:

 

Interesting. I thought (know) that Scotland and Wales were in Great Britain. Does Great Britain just mean England here, perhaps?

Great Britain is the island - "great" because it's the largest island of the British Isles. So it does indeed include (the majority of) Scotland and Wales - but not N.Ireland despite the latter being part of the UK. However in loose, everyday usage sometimes Britain is used synonymously with the UK.

 

I would say that I think the percentages daveb gave are overlapping - i.e. that the 55% includes some of the other percentages - except that they add to 100%, which suggests they are exclusive, unless there are further results that aren't included. So I don't know really...

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Tunhope

Everyone's DNA results are fascinating. I love @faraday☘ 's pie chart.  I know nothing about my father's side of my family and very little about my mother's and that might be a reason for wanting to do a test though I've never done it. Mind you, if I got results like Spotastic's, I'd be totally confused. I know I've got some Manx (as in Isle of Man not Manchester, the city)

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Midland Tyke
On 1/10/2019 at 11:58 PM, pickles mcgee said:

That sounds breathtaking, Tyke, in more ways than one.  Have you posted pics?

Here goes. For those who have vertigo issues, watch at your own risk. The first 3 minutes (up until the tunnel!) are the worst. I'd also say that the railings are in a poorer state of repair now.

 

 

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Muledeer
2 hours ago, michaeld said:

Great Britain is the island - "great" because it's the largest island of the British Isles.

 That is what I have learned from my experience here on AVEN.  When I first came here, I thought that England = Britain, not realizing that Scotland and Wales were actually different countries.  I assume the British Isles includes Ireland?  Correct me if I'm wrong - but the UK is the nation, including all the colonies like Gilbralter.  Within that nation are individual countries like Wales and Northern Ireland.  One can claim to be British if from anywhere in the UK, but they can also claim to be Scotch or Welsh, or Manx (just learned that one from @Tunhope.

 

Because of my Mormon heritage, my family's geneology has been traced all the way back to the late 1700's.  All sides were from the British Isles.  My brother had a DNA test that basically confirmed our pedigree charts.  So, I really don't have much interest in knowing much more than that.   But I would really, really like to visit the UK, (and also Ireland), someday.

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Muledeer
28 minutes ago, Midland Tyke said:

Here goes. For those who have vertigo issues, watch at your own risk. The first 3 minutes (up until the tunnel!) are the worst. I'd also say that the railings are in a poorer state of repair now.

 

 

That was thrilling!  I loved the music as well.  What an incredible hike!

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ryn2
57 minutes ago, Midland Tyke said:

Here goes. For those who have vertigo issues, watch at your own risk. The first 3 minutes (up until the tunnel!) are the worst. I'd also say that the railings are in a poorer state of repair now.

 

 

That’s lovely scenery but I would have really struggled without something to hold onto.  My fear of heights presents as an irrational fear of tipping over.

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Tja
1 hour ago, Midland Tyke said:

Here goes. For those who have vertigo issues, watch at your own risk. The first 3 minutes (up until the tunnel!) are the worst. I'd also say that the railings are in a poorer state of repair now.

 

 

Stunning! I'd do it in a heartbeat! Thanks for sharing, @Midland Tyke. :)

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michaeld
1 hour ago, Muledeer said:

 That is what I have learned from my experience here on AVEN.  When I first came here, I thought that England = Britain, not realizing that Scotland and Wales were actually different countries.  I assume the British Isles includes Ireland?  Correct me if I'm wrong - but the UK is the nation, including all the colonies like Gilbralter.  Within that nation are individual countries like Wales and Northern Ireland.  One can claim to be British if from anywhere in the UK, but they can also claim to be Scotch or Welsh, or Manx (just learned that one from @Tunhope.

Yes the British Isles includes Ireland as well as GB, the Isle of Man plus about 6000 or so smaller islands. However the name "British Isles" is controversial in Ireland especially among nationalists, as the term British obviously has associations with the UK. Some prefer the term "Britain and Ireland" though I'm not sure that includes all the other islands in the archipeligo.

 

Unfortunately there is no consistently agreed usage when it comes to the words "country" and "nation". The UK is a country but you can also consider England, Scotland, Wales and N.Ireland to be countries too. "A country within a country". Ditto "nation". There are some people who try to make a difference, e.g. saying the constituents are nations whereas only the UK is a country. But there is nothing generally accepted along these lines.

 

However the UK is the sovereign state. None of England, Scotland, Wales or N.Ireland are sovereign states in their own right as they are all part of the political union making the UK. The UN member is the UK, other countries have an international relationship with the UK, with a UK embassy. So from an international perspective, it's the UK that's the country.

 

To confuse things further, I believe Gibraltar is not considered part of the UK though it is British. It's a British overseas territory and it's considered a dependency of the UK but not part of the UK itself. Same applies to the Falklands, Bermuda and other British overseas territories.

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Tunhope

If I had to take a citizenship test and was asked about the make up of my country/ nation, I'd fail the test. I think a lot of people in the UK would. I think of myself as English, rarely as British. For me, 'British' has overtones of colonialism. Actually, I think of myself as northern English .

Don't know how you managed that walk @Midland Tyke. Wow!

 

 

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Skycaptain

@Midland Tyke, I get vertigo on anything higher than a barstool, but that scenery was stunning.

I see a "Portuguese walk of death" meet up in the offing 

 

I've always heard "Great Britain and Northern Ireland" to describe the UK. As has been said there are many places which are British but not British such as the Channel Islands, Isle of Man etc, 

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michaeld
1 minute ago, Skycaptain said:

I've always heard "Great Britain and Northern Ireland" to describe the UK.

Well the full name of the UK is the "United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland" so that isn't surprising. 😛

 

I consider myself British. If anything the term English has overtones of nationalism for me, though there is no particular reason it should. It might depend on location...

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Spotastic
4 hours ago, Tunhope said:

Mind you, if I got results like Spotastic's, I'd be totally confused. 

The site actually explains what they mean by each result you get, and even goes into the history of the migrations from those regions. I'm still processing all of it.

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Spotastic
2 hours ago, Midland Tyke said:

Here goes. For those who have vertigo issues, watch at your own risk. The first 3 minutes (up until the tunnel!) are the worst. I'd also say that the railings are in a poorer state of repair now.

 

 

How large is that strip of land to walk across in the beginning? I'd be afraid my size 13 shoes (47 Euro size, 12.5 UK) wouldn't fit on it... besides the whole fear of heights thing.

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daveb

I only managed to watch a few bits of that video before shutting it off. :blink:

 

I did a different dna test thing a few years ago, which was more about the distant past and showed things like which waves of migration from Africa (or non-migration as the case may be) your ancestors likely fell into and where those migrations went. It was a broader and more distant (in terms of time) look at ancestry. What all of  these dna tests do is look at various genetic markers (which have been discovered over time by comparing things like actual genealogies and traits and other non-dna information with dna to find the genetic markers) that establish various levels of probability of certain traits and things like ancestry. Some genetic markers are more precise than others (because some can be linked more directly to certain traits than others), but most of the ones they use for these tests have a reasonable level of reliability. And they refine their algorithms as new information comes in.

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teatree

I get a word-of-the-day in my email. Apropos of nothing (except that I thought it interesting!), today's was "boycott"--I had no idea of its origin!

 

In the 1870s, Irish farmers faced an agricultural crisis that threatened to result in a repeat of the terrible famine and mass evictions of the 1840s. Anticipating financial ruin, they formed a Land League to campaign against the rent increases and evictions landlords were imposing as a result of the crisis. Retired British army captain Charles Boycott had the misfortune to be acting as an agent for an absentee landlord at the time, and when he tried to evict tenant farmers for refusing to pay their rent, he was ostracized by the League and community. His laborers and servants quit, and his crops began to rot. Boycott's fate was soon well known, and his name became a byword for that particular protest strategy.

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Semisweet

@Spotastic, you are truly a citizen of the world. :)

 

In theory i’d very much like to do a DNA test and see what turns up, but I’m wary about the whole data privacy aspect.

 

Thanks for posting the video link, @Midland Tyke — that is truly gorgeous. In person it would be lost on me, though, as I’d be too focused just on not falling off either side. :unsure:

 

I find word origins fascinating too, @teatree, and probably more words than we think came from people’s names.

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Midland Tyke
3 hours ago, Spotastic said:

How large is that strip of land to walk across in the beginning? I'd be afraid my size 13 shoes (47 Euro size, 12.5 UK) wouldn't fit on it... besides the whole fear of heights thing.

the levada rim is about 50 cm (1.5ft) wide. My UK size 10 boots had to be placed precisely. So you'd have to be even more exact...

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ryn2
16 minutes ago, Semisweet said:

In theory i’d very much like to do a DNA test and see what turns up, but I’m wary about the whole data privacy aspect.

Same, especially because - even if the company itself does not sell or misuse your data - any unscrupulous (or zealous) relatives and their friends/family still can.

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GoneForGood
25 minutes ago, ryn2 said:

Same, especially because - even if the company itself does not sell or misuse your data - any unscrupulous (or zealous) relatives and their friends/family still can.

Unscrupulous friends?/family (question mark since anyone who would do this I would not consider a friend) can do this anyway. Grab a few hairs from your brush

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ryn2
7 minutes ago, MakeLoveNotWar said:

Unscrupulous friends?/family (question mark since anyone who would do this I would not consider a friend) can do this anyway. Grab a few hairs from your brush

Agreed, but they have to work harder and actually be in my house/follow me around at work/etc.  I was thinking more of people who would be shown my information but that I don’t actually in any way know...

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Skycaptain

@Semisweet, truly gorgeous, humph :P:P

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Semisweet
18 minutes ago, Skycaptain said:

@Semisweet, truly gorgeous, humph :P:P

I must be slowing down, that wasn’t even intentional! :blush:

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pickles mcgee
17 hours ago, Midland Tyke said:

I'd also say that the railings are in a poorer state of repair now.

And some spots seemed sans railing entirely!  I'm not sure how I would feel about walking that if I was there; I like to think that I would be "up" for it (or down in the water? Was that channel deep?).

 

16 hours ago, Tja said:

Stunning! I'd do it in a heartbeat!

This surprised me, after our ladder chat (but I do think you said you're not afraid of heights, just ladders).  It's all quite interesting, where people draw the line.  I've been wondering what actually constitutes a "height," and I'm sure it's quite different for different folks, depending on: height from the ground, narrowness of the platform, and sheerness of the drop-off.

 

12 hours ago, teatree said:

I get a word-of-the-day in my email. Apropos of nothing (except that I thought it interesting!), today's was "boycott"--I had no idea of its origin!

Super cool, @teatree!  That's a great idea, a word of the day.

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pickles mcgee
14 hours ago, Skycaptain said:

I see a "Portuguese walk of death" meet up in the offing 

😄

 

Portugal sounds wonderful.  My brother and niece went a couple years ago, and my widely-traveled brother said I should move it to the top of my list.

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Tja
1 hour ago, pickles mcgee said:

This surprised me, after our ladder chat (but I do think you said you're not afraid of heights, just ladders)

As long as there are no ladders involved, the higher the better.😊

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Midland Tyke
6 hours ago, pickles mcgee said:

And some spots seemed sans railing entirely!  I'm not sure how I would feel about walking that if I was there; I like to think that I would be "up" for it (or down in the water? Was that channel deep?).

 

 

Levadas are typically 30 to 60 cm deep (1 to 2 ft). How full of water, and how fast it flows, varies enormously.

 

I quite like mainland Portugal. There is a lot of agriculture (Olive and cork trees, in particular). But Madeira was a cut above that. Much steeper, greener and because it's not a big island, its compact, too. The driving is a bit scary, though.

 

In many ways Madeira reminded me of inland French Riviera ('inland' because Madeira has no beaches).

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chandrakirti
8 hours ago, pickles mcgee said:

And some spots seemed sans railing entirely!  I'm not sure how I would feel about walking that if I was there; I like to think that I would be "up" for it (or down in the water? Was that channel deep?).

...one that can be done on the hands and knees then!

 

On the DNA front- 

21 hours ago, daveb said:

did a different dna test thing a few years ago, which was more about the distant past and showed things like which waves of migration from Africa (or non-migration as the case may be) your ancestors likely fell into and where those migrations went. It was a broader and more distant (in terms of time) look at ancestry. What all of  these dna tests do is look at various genetic markers (which have been discovered over time by comparing things like actual genealogies and traits and other non-dna information with dna to find the genetic markers) that establish various levels of probability of certain traits and things like ancestry. Some genetic markers are more precise than others (because some can be linked more directly to certain traits than others), but most of the ones they use for these tests have a reasonable level of reliability. And they refine their algorithms as new information comes in.

Yes @daveb, I noticed that after my daughter linked up with me, it adjusted things on our trait record . also the one we did,, 23 and me, had loads of questions about our daily lives and that would go towards new algorithms.

 

@teatree , you might now want to look up the stories behind the words Hooligan- and there are a few others like that!

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Tunhope

Place name etymology too. Gosh - we could have a whole thread on word derivations. I'd love it.

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daveb
9 minutes ago, Tunhope said:

Place name etymology too. Gosh - we could have a whole thread on word derivations. I'd love it.

Oh! That's one of my interests. For me, particularly place names in the British Isles. I have several books on the subject. :) 

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