boots57

anyone past 50 on here?

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ryn2
2 hours ago, daveb said:

And he couldn't lay that person off without laying off everyone in that section with lower seniority.

Sleazy!  Too bad he didn’t put all that energy into doing his own job better.

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Midland Tyke

I was once the subject of a corporate reorganisation that reduced the total job count by just one. Me! Strangely all the people who reported to me at that time (about 200 or so) got new reporting lines, but none of the new positions, somehow, were sufficiently 'new' that they were advertised or subject to interviews. It was such a poor show. I'd been with the company nearly 20 years. But I was lucky - redundancy terms were good (and I made sure they got better given the inappropriate way they'd gone about it) and in truth I wasn't suited to the company. I managed to get another job soon and it was better for me (or at least it was for a while); and it started me off in a different working pattern altogether, too.

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Semisweet
On 11/17/2018 at 10:37 AM, chandrakirti said:

not that I'm implying we all have arthritis here because we're over 50....😄

Actually, we probably all do have arthritis of at least one kind or another, whether we're conscious of (or bothered by) it or not -- it's a standard hazard of reaching this age range. Speaking of which, I've newly graduated to the next decade and might wander over to the 60s forum to poke my head in.🙂

 

@ryn2, belated sympathies on the sudden departure of your partner. I wish you well in transitioning to your next phase and hope it has many good things in store for you.

 

Welcome, @hypercat! I hope you get to meet plenty of fellow forum members in your area. :cake:

 

@cdrdash, your visit with Bob sounds positive notwithstanding the conversational complexities. 

 

Re: layoffs/corporate reorganizations -- they always seem to be handled so badly by people who you'd think would know better (or be more compassionate). When I was laid off from a longtime job, several other managers with whom I'd had close working relationships never said another word to me --  on the advice, I'd guess, of the company's lawyers. Because if they wished me well or expressed regret about my layoff, I might sue them or something? :huh: At least that wasn't nearly as bad as several cases I know in which longtime well-regarded employees were laid off and given all of 30 minutes to clean out their desks and be escorted out by a security guard. :(

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daveb
52 minutes ago, Semisweet said:

we probably all do have arthritis

Not me. :P (I won't claim any malady/condition that I don't feel and haven't had diagnosed) :P 

 

54 minutes ago, Semisweet said:

Re: layoffs/corporate reorganizations -- they always seem to be handled so badly by people who you'd think would know better (or be more compassionate).

Not in the case I mentioned. He sucked up to people above him, but everyone below him knew what an outstanding human being he was. :P 

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chandrakirti
5 hours ago, daveb said:

Not in the case I mentioned. He sucked up to people above him, but everyone below him knew what an outstanding human being he was. :P 

By what you say @daveb, he sounds rather like another guy I used to know. But business is full of those!

@Midland Tyke, oddly enough my parting words to her was that she'll find something much better after all the work she put into this place.

@Semisweet, it's the same in the hospitals where I worked.People were warned not to speak to a forced leaver...I think it was to stop the real reasons for their departure being outed, saving the embarrassment of the dodgy managers..who usually sacked people before they outed the managerial machinations like fraud...

 

On arthritis, there's a very good advert on telly right now, with someone trying their best to get out of bed, gritting their teeth through the pain. Very accurate and will probably help increase the research funding for arthritic conditions. Well timed too, this is the time of year for the sore backs to make a reappearance...(rubs Voltarol vigorously...no puns now @Skycaptain!)

 

Caught sight of my bike in a shop window last night and my reflective spokes are working very well. I intend to cycle all year if it doesn't snow, so if a car/pedestrian gets me, it'll not be for lack of hi vis! Three front lights, two back ones, totally yellow jacket and trousers, reflective spokes....err is that overkill?😄

 

Happy Tuesday!

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Skycaptain

@chandrakirti, the way that's been told makes me wonder if there's more to "made redundant" than meets the eye, not least because in UK employment law if a position which was made redundant becomes available within six months it must first be offered to the person laid off. 

 

Would I ever make a pun about rubbing vigorously to ease stiffness? 😋 😋 

 

We just had our first "wintery shower" of the season, that definitely had a touch of sleet in it 

 

 

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ryn2
4 hours ago, chandrakirti said:

Caught sight of my bike in a shop window last night and my reflective spokes are working very well. I intend to cycle all year if it doesn't snow, so if a car/pedestrian gets me, it'll not be for lack of hi vis! Three front lights, two back ones, totally yellow jacket and trousers, reflective spokes....err is that overkill?😄

You can never be too visible biking!

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Muledeer

@Skycaptain, you were superbly set up for that pun.  Good one!

@chandrakirti Do you also wear a helmet when riding your bike?  It sounds like you have done everything possible to avoid a bike / car collision.   Sounds like a cycling Christmas tree  😎

I find the term "redundant" unusual when referring to a person.  I have always thought of it as a term in language usage.....like ...um...hot water heater.

Around here, we commonly use the terms "laid off" or RIF (reduction in force) when referring to workforce reductions.

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ryn2
25 minutes ago, Muledeer said:

I find the term "redundant" unusual when referring to a person.  I have always thought of it as a term in language usage.....like ...um...hot water heater.

Around here, we commonly use the terms "laid off" or RIF (reduction in force) when referring to workforce reductions.

We use RIF/layoff for termination without cause where I live as well, but in my last job I worked for (and was laid off from) a medium-sized, US-based, international company that was quite RIF-prone so I got used to the term redundancy as well.

 

I think it’s technically the position itself that is redundant (as in duplicates something existing already) rather than the individual.  That’s why you’re not supposed to backfill it; officially, you’ve let the person go because the job no longer needs doing.

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Spotastic
16 hours ago, Semisweet said:

Actually, we probably all do have arthritis of at least one kind or another, whether we're conscious of (or bothered by) it or not -- it's a standard hazard of reaching this age range. Speaking of which, I've newly graduated to the next decade and might wander over to the 60s forum to poke my head in.🙂

As the resident young one of the 50's thread, I will add that I have arthritis in my knees and back, and my wife has psoriatic arthristis. I think it's more common for those in the 30's range than most people think.

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chandrakirti

@chandrakirti, the way that's been told makes me wonder if there's more to "made redundant" than meets the eye, not least because in UK employment law if a position which was made redundant becomes available within six months it must first be offered to the person laid off.

 

Yes @Skycaptain, one of my colleagues opened up her email inbox today ans scrolled back 2 weeks  ...the job was advertised while this person was on sick leave! Something has indeed 'gone down' ..... it's more than just a 'redundancy'. Imagine seeing your job being advertised then coming back to work and being let go like that! We're all speculating...another theory is that the 2 weeks sick time was the initial reaction to being let go. In any case, it sucks!

 

@Spotastic, I'm sorry for any younger person with Psoriatic arthritis - very tough to deal with.

 

@ryn2 & @Muledeer, yes 'redundancy' is a UK term for lay off. A bit like 'human resources' replaced 'personnel....😣

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