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Howard

Found this interesting

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Howard

Here's a link to a study on asexuality and gender. I found it quite interesting and want to share it with you all.

https://cedar.wwu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1081&context=wwu_honors

This not being the hot box, I will refrain from stating my opinion and unqualified observations.

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alto

This should be moved to the Hot Box so it can be discussed further.

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Howard

I suggest we discuss it right here and if it gets heated, let the mods move the thread. I'll go first.

I was surprised cis-gendered males were a minority. I think it's because of society's pressure on men to be more outgoing, to usualy be the one making the first move. I now it was my case when I was much sexualy active in my teens and early 20. I acted hypersexual because I wanted to fit in. Around my mid-twenties, I stopped caring less what people think and I stopped seeking parternered sex.

I find uplifting that there are more youths identifying as asexuals than the general public uplifting. I think it's a consequence of asexuality being more more known for people to identify as such.

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AceViking

Thanks for posting this.

 

I skimmed through it and didn't learn anything new, although some of the responses are interesting. I also thought it's interesting that questions were asked about religion.

 

I think it's fairly well known that the gender distribution of asexuals doesn't match that of the general population. I've heard of similar findings in surveys on bisexuals and homosexuals (more females among bisexuals and more males among homosexuals). Several different ideas have been put forward as to why the gender distribution doesn't match, but it's not known for certain why. It's one of the mysteries of sexual orientation and gender. Perhaps someday there will be answers.

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Homer

This is about "labels" as a whole more than anything...

 

Quote

Anyway, DT, you’re someone who enjoys dirty talk. There isn’t a special term (or pride flag) for you that I could find—I did a little half-hearted googling myself—and I don’t think you need one. You can get by with “I’m someone who enjoys dirty talk.”

 

If people took this advice, a lot of the problems around "fitting in" and "What am I" would disappear miracuolously. Unlike meat market apps, real life isn't about putting every tiny aspect of yourself into neat little boxes to tick off. Literally nothing changes just by having an extra word for "I'm someone who enjoys dirty talk." Also, I'd find someone who places such an emphasis on a rather miniscule aspect of oneself that it warrants basing any sense of identity on to be fairly creepy.

 

Meet Jack, joining a table full of people he had never met before.

 

"Hi, I'm Jack and I work as an accountant." - Fair.

"Hi, I'm Jack and I enjoy dirty talk." - WTF

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Howard
1 hour ago, Homer said:

This is about "labels" as a whole more than anything...

Pehaps sexuality plays a small role in one's psyche, but I find that gender is a fair part of one's identity. I will never say ''I'm Howard and I'm a man'' because it's pretty obvious that I am.

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Homer
12 minutes ago, Howard said:

I will never say ''I'm Howard and I'm a man'' because it's pretty obvious that I am.

On the other hand, that will have a lot of people scream in agony about assuming someone's gender... it's pretty much a minefield either way.

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KrysLostInSpace
17 hours ago, Howard said:

 I will never say ''I'm Howard and I'm a man'' because it's pretty obvious that I am.

*Howie

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Acing It

I also skim read it as I don't have time at the moment but a few considerations/observations:

  • I'm not sure whether this is viewed through the lens of the 'stereotype' or whether the research brought out the stereotypes mentioned in the paper. If the first, then I'm not that impressed.
  • It comes across as culturally biased somehow and I wonder how different cultures were taken into account in the survey and if they weren't, why not, as it misses the point slightly in a world that is far from culturally homogenous anymore. Maybe it was just the scope or brief of the survey that didn't allow for this. I don't know.
  • Where are the references in the text? Statements such as 'Hegemonic gender roles and gender norms have a huge effect on individuals, and on society as a whole' and many, many others in the text require a reference. Otherwise they can be seen as just assumptions, hearsay etc...

I did find it an interesting read and it confirms with my feelings about what is going on.

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