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Januarygirl

Real Estate

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Januarygirl

I'm 42, and am considering buying a home out of state for retirement some day. I live in the Los Angeles area and want to eventually move to N. Carolina where my kinfolk ( no longer living) were from. I just love it there. I wonder though since I'm thinking of making a long-term commitment- not just buying to turn around and sell if the market picks up- if I should buy in an area that is already highly desireable, or just something in an area that I like that is not as economically desireable. I'm interested in the mts. around Asheville, Brevard, maybe Clyde or Canton. Just thought I'd give this forum a shot. Also don't know if I want a condo or small house since it's just me!

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Ziffler

Can't really give any advice on house or condo or where to buy, but I do like your choice of area for retirement. I love the mountains. And that area of the country has so much to offer.

Good luck with your decision and home hunting.

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Busrider

I'd prefer a condo. Advantages: I can't afford more. I will not have to climb my roof during a thunderstorm to do some emergency thatching. I also hate yard work, the idea of being forced to shovel snow away from a pavement with athritic hands and so on.

As my name suggests I love the availability of public transport and some infrastructure around me, to do at least basic shopping and feel no need to mailorder my milk. - A friend of mine lives in a quite infrastructureless village and is heavily dependant of others to give him lifts to the supermarket he can't reach on his own. Living damn close to one is really nice IMHO.

Dissadvantages: Neighbours masturbating with their inefficient electric drills all day long (noise) and others complaining about you doing something noisy like running your TV loud enough to be audible.

Double edged sword: Space. Howmuch I might ever have; I'll cramp it with more or less collectible stuff. - That's sure. - OTOH how much do I need really? Wouldn't make boiling down the possesions to something more handleable and easier to clean sence?

Figure out what you'll need. Keep in mind that the active life after retirement is compareably short and can be followed by a long time of hardly getting along with essential routines. To me it had been clear that the necessarry daily stuff has priority over optional nice things when it comes to choosing a home.

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KAGU143

It took me a while to do it since I was working with a shoestring budget, but about 12-13 years ago I managed to buy 2 acres of undeveloped wooded land and eventually, after some clearing and grading, getting a well, septic system, foundation, telephone and electric, etc, I purchased and brought in a double-wide manufactured home.

It was probably the smartest thing I ever did. I'm not in a very high priced area but it has still gone up in value tremendously. I really don't think you can go wrong buying real estate unless it's in a flood zone or an old landfill or something.

Just remember that property taxes will probably end up being your biggest expense, especially if you are in a popular area with a lot of services. My taxes are already close to what my mortgage was, and that's after only 12 years. They continue to go up.

-Greybird

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pinkfizzie

well if i wanted to buy like 2 acres cheap where would be good? I love n carolina my favorite state . heck I can not even afford one home let alone 2. Any one have n extra 100.000 lying around?

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HannaWyLady

I'm in Colorado now but am going back to Wyoming shortly. If you can enjoy isolation in towns of less than 500 people that is the place to be. Go to www.realtor.com and check out the prices in Saratoga, Hanna, and Medicine Bow WY. There is no state income tax or tax on food in WY. And property taxes are usually less than $500 per year. Gas for the car is cheaper than most other states also.

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