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Jarle

Research Request: Perceptions of Infidelity

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Jarle

Hi All, 

 

We received the following from Hailey from Saint Louis University:

 

Quote

My name is Hailey Hatch and I am a PhD student at Saint Louis University (SLU) in St. Louis, MO. I am working with a fellow PhD student at SLU, Lijing Ma, to conduct research on perceptions of infidelity in asexual and/or aromantic communities.

 

We are currently conducting a study examining the perceptions of infidelity in asexual and/or aromantic folx. We are now seeking individuals who identify on the asexual and/or aromantic spectrums to participate in our study and answer questions about your perceptions of infidelity in relationships. If you are currently in a relationship, you will also be asked to answer questions about your current relationship.

 

As a token of our appreciation for your help, you will be given the opportunity to enter to win 1 of 2 ($25) Amazon gift cards at the end of the study.

 

Participation is expected to take approximately 20-30 minutes.

Please follow the link below to be directed to the online survey:

https://slu.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_cAy2BKxbRtFwYlv

 

Thank you so much for your time!

 

Please feel free to share this study with others.

This study has been approved by the Research Approval Board. 

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Sithgroundhog

Done. 

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Nowhere Girl

"Folx"?!!!

Really, this is horribly colloquial! The letter "x" by itself has nothing to do with gender inclusivity, "asexual people" is just as inclusive! Extremely colloquial words such as "folx" or even "folks" shouldn't be used in research requests.

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hatchh
1 hour ago, Nowhere Girl said:

"Folx"?!!!

Really, this is horribly colloquial! The letter "x" by itself has nothing to do with gender inclusivity, "asexual people" is just as inclusive! Extremely colloquial words such as "folx" or even "folks" shouldn't be used in research requests.

Hi!
 

Thank you for your feedback! As a researcher, I try to be as inclusive as possible. I understand the use of “folx” may be colloquial; however, I’ve altered language throughout my academic career to reflect previous comments on inclusivity. I also try to touch base with LGBTQ+ coordinators in the area I’m from. It may be a US Midwestern term, as that’s where I’m located. I truly do strive to be as inclusive as possible and am very receptive to feedback. 
 

Best, 

Hailey 

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MiffKeks

Did it! Hope it can shed a little light to our knowledge one day!

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Philip027
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The risks to you as a participant are minimal. Potential risks include boredom and fatigue,

Hahaha, okay, I'm going to do it just based on that

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Laurann

Hey @hatchh!

I've just got a question for you, I'm not sure I get what you mean with the question 'How do you think about sexual/romantic relationships'?

That's a bit broad, and I'm not sure what kind of answer you were looking for.

I'm going to wait for your answer before I submit the survey :) 

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Nowhere Girl
6 hours ago, hatchh said:

Thank you for your feedback! As a researcher, I try to be as inclusive as possible. I understand the use of “folx” may be colloquial; however, I’ve altered language throughout my academic career to reflect previous comments on inclusivity. I also try to touch base with LGBTQ+ coordinators in the area I’m from. It may be a US Midwestern term, as that’s where I’m located. I truly do strive to be as inclusive as possible and am very receptive to feedback.

But as I wrote, "people" is inclusive by itself.

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hatchh
4 hours ago, Laurann said:

Hey @hatchh!

I've just got a question for you, I'm not sure I get what you mean with the question 'How do you think about sexual/romantic relationships'?

That's a bit broad, and I'm not sure what kind of answer you were looking for.

I'm going to wait for your answer before I submit the survey :) 

Hi! Thank you for reaching out for clarification! 
 

Honestly, it’s however you interpret it — we just want to know what folx perceptions are. There aren’t any right or wrong answers. I hope that helps some! :) 

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hatchh
2 hours ago, Nowhere Girl said:

But as I wrote, "people" is inclusive by itself.

Thank you for your feedback! I take all feedback into consideration for current and future research endeavors. 

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Laurann
11 hours ago, hatchh said:

Hi! Thank you for reaching out for clarification! 
 

Honestly, it’s however you interpret it — we just want to know what folx perceptions are. There aren’t any right or wrong answers. I hope that helps some! :) 

Ehh it doesn't help too much.

The question 'how do you think about romantic relationships' could mean:

  • How do you define romantic relationships, as opposed to platonic relationships, or as opposed to sexual relationships?
  • Do you think romantic relationships are a negative or a positive thing in your life, in other people's lives, in society as a whole, or in the media? What parts are negative, and what parts positive?
  • What is the impact amatonormativity has had on your life, or on society etc?
  • What would your ideal romantic relationship look like. Is it monogamous, polyamorous, an open relationship? Is it long distance? What kind of feelings and behaviors does it include? Would you live together or separately? Would it include kids?
  • What's your opinion on the societally accepted standard model of a romantic relationship (which is generally monogamous, includes romantic feelings and sex, as well as marriage and kids), as in, is it restrictive, healthy, universal, dependent on culture, sexist, idealized, out of reach, ordained by God, culturally imposed etc? 
  • Does such a societal model exist in the first place, or should we look at every relationship as completely unique and individual, no stereotypes?
  • Do you attach more importance to having a healthy platonic support network (family, friends) or to having a healthy romantic relationship?
  • What are your lived experiences with past or current romantic relationships?

Of course there aren't any right or wrong answers in a survey, but I don't know what question I'm supposed to answer. And I can't answer all of them, that's a bit much. 'What my perceptions are' and 'however you interpret it' is still too vague and broad.

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hatchh
56 minutes ago, Laurann said:

Ehh it doesn't help too much.

The question 'how do you think about romantic relationships' could mean:

  • How do you define romantic relationships, as opposed to platonic relationships, or as opposed to sexual relationships?
  • Do you think romantic relationships are a negative or a positive thing in your life, in other people's lives, in society as a whole, or in the media? What parts are negative, and what parts positive?
  • What is the impact amatonormativity has had on your life, or on society etc?
  • What would your ideal romantic relationship look like. Is it monogamous, polyamorous, an open relationship? Is it long distance? What kind of feelings and behaviors does it include? Would you live together or separately? Would it include kids?
  • What's your opinion on the societally accepted standard model of a romantic relationship (which is generally monogamous, includes romantic feelings and sex, as well as marriage and kids), as in, is it restrictive, healthy, universal, dependent on culture, sexist, idealized, out of reach, ordained by God, culturally imposed etc? 
  • Does such a societal model exist in the first place, or should we look at every relationship as completely unique and individual, no stereotypes?
  • Do you attach more importance to having a healthy platonic support network (family, friends) or to having a healthy romantic relationship?
  • What are your lived experiences with past or current romantic relationships?

Of course there aren't any right or wrong answers in a survey, but I don't know what question I'm supposed to answer. And I can't answer all of them, that's a bit much. 'What my perceptions are' and 'however you interpret it' is still too vague and broad.

Hi again! 
 

I apologize for my lack of clarity. I really appreciate you taking the time to reach out! Out of the options you presented, the first bullet most closely represents what we’re asking with the question (How do you define romantic relationships as opposed to other types of relationships). 
 

Please let me know if you have any other questions or concerns!

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Acing It

Done! ('folx' ... what's that all about? hahah... those weird Americans)

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hatchh

Hi everyone -- I just wanted to mention that we're doing a last call for data collection. Data collection will end a week from today (10/13 at 5pm US CST). 

 

Thank you so much to everyone who has participated this far -- we are extremely grateful for all of the responses and feedback!

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GlamRocker

I'm really interested in how this turns out. I took this and I think it asks some really good questions. I just hope I didn't make mistakes doing mine! I usually like to recheck my work before I submit to prevent this, but this test doesn't work that way. Maybe I made some stupid mistakes! Or failed to explain something I should have!

 

This test also made me think about my views on infidelity, something I haven't really "fleshed out" in my mind. I'm worried my views are naive because of how trivial sex is to me, since it doesn't make me feel anything special. I'm not sure if many sexual people are like that.

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JessicaKay

I think this is so interesting to research, I study sociology and during our survey project about deviant behavior, we have mentioned infidelity. But it is so wide, that is why we decided to dedicate another survey to better research this one issue. I am happy I have found this thread, so I can ask you about yours after we will start. I think we will need some instruction about the first steps of research, I thought we just will apply to this https://uk.edubirdie.com/ educational service to get some help with it. Sometimes, when I really need help with writing, I ask help on that service, I find it as the best essay writing service. Do you have some resources you get help from? Please, share it, thanks!

Edited by JessicaKay

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Acing It
On 9/25/2019 at 5:24 AM, LeChat said:

For those who are interested, there's a Wikipedia page, which explains the history of the term "folx."

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Folx_(term)

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name.

Thank you, that explains a lot 😂 (not sure what happened there)

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LeChat
3 hours ago, Acing It said:

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name.

Thank you, that explains a lot 😂 (not sure what happened there)

Ooh, I've just clicked on the link I gave, months ago, again, and saw from the page that, apparently, a user chose to delete all of the info on the page. (So, I guess someone didn't like or agree with what was written on the page; it's rude, though, to delete all of that info and links that others gave and spent all of that time, gathering information, and for one person to decide for others what they should or shouldn't get to read for themselves. There's been a long history of queer POC having their history, thoughts, ideas, etc. erased by others who aren't queer or POC).

 

Basically, it discussed how some queer, POC (people of color) came to use the term. But, it also mentioned the term first being used in the 1800s, which I found interesting and important, as it seems that some people seem to think it was a recently invented, made-up word by queer POC.

 

Sorry, for the long post, but I've tried to gather some of the links for you and others and quoted some, in case any of those pages get deleted, too.

 

Oh, I found a cache of the page.

 

https://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:zyboHAkHBF8J:https://en.everybodywiki.com/Folx_(term)+&cd=16&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us

 

 

Quote

 

Folx, an alternative spelling of the word folks, is a gender neutral collective noun used to address a group of people.[1] Although the term "folks" is already gender-neutral, the ending "-x" on "folx" specifically and explicitly includes and highlights LGBTQ, gender non-conforming, and non-binary people (who do not identify within the gender binary),[2] just like the "-x" in the term Latinx.[3] It can also be used to signal inclusion of people of color[4].

HistoryEdit

According to Word Spy lexicographer Paul McFedries, the spelling "folx" has existed for "at least a century".[5] According to McFedries, the first published use of "folx" in its modern sense appeared in 2001 in a blog post written by BiNet Los Angeles board member and owner of GirlFags.com Clare in describing her identity as well as other queer identities.[6][7] The first documented definition of "folx" appeared in 2006, when an individual named Ranmoth provided a definition of "folx" on Urban Dictionary.[8] In a 2014 Tumblr post the activist organization Trans Folx Fighting Eating Disorders cited inclusion of queer, transgender, and gender diverse identities as their reason for their exclusive use of this spelling.[9] In particular, LGBTQ communities of color have embraced the term "folx" to emphasize that the presence of a binary gender system in indigenous societies is a product of colonization and oppression of indigenous peoples.[10][11] According to linguistics professor and blogger Lal Zimman, the "x" suggests solidarity with marginalized communities and represents "the everyday people".[5][12]

A 2016 study showed that only a small percentage of queer, transgender, non-binary, or genderqueer people had familiarity with the term "folx".[13] Most frequent usage of the term occurs in California.[9][10] Through Tumblr blogs, increased recognition of the term in safe space training, and the spread of the word through activist circles, some academics anticipate that the term will gain more currency in English-speaking colleges and universities.[14][15][16][17] The term appears in some books and scholarly publications.[18][19][20][21]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Tara K. Soughers (2018). Beyond a Binary God: A Theology for Trans* Allies. Church Publishing, Inc. p. 17. ISBN 9780898690057.
  2. Kapitan, Alex (12 September 2016). "Ask a Radical Copyeditor: Folx". Radical Copyeditor.
  3. Pastrana, Jr., Antonio (Jay); Battle, Juan; Harris, Angelique (2016). An Examination of Latinx LGBT Populations Across the United States: Intersections of Race and Sexuality. p. 4. ISBN 9781137560742. In this document, however, we will use the term "Latinx." It is similar to "Latino," but the "x" erases gender, making the category inclusive of men, women, agendered, trans*, gender-nonconforming, gender-queer and gender-fluid people.
  4. "What does the term "folx" mean? - For Folx Sake". For Folx Sake Podcast. 2019-09-08. Retrieved 2019-09-13.
  5. 5.05.1 Peters, Mark (2017-05-09). "Womyn, wimmin, and other folx". The Boston Globe. Retrieved 2018-01-21.
  6. "Clare". Queer By Choice. 2001. Retrieved 2018-01-25.
  7. "folx". World Spy. 2016-03-24. Retrieved 2018-01-25.
  8. "Folx". Urban Dictionary. 2006-04-26. Retrieved 2018-01-21.
  9. 9.09.1 "Why do you use the term "folx"? I'm curious about spelling it that way instead of "folks"". T-FFED: TRANS FOLX FIGHTING EATING DISORDERS. 2014-07-14. Retrieved 2018-01-21.
  10. 10.010.1 Porter, Tori-Ann (2015–2016). "Open Letter to the Oppressor" (PDF). Prized Writing 2015–2016: 9–18.
  11. Torrez, Danielle. "Mixed-Race Folx". Sutori. Retrieved 2018-01-21.
  12. Zimman, Lal (2017). "Transgender language reform: Challenges and strategies for promoting trans-affirming, gender-inclusive language". Journal of Language and Discrimination. 1: 84–105. doi:10.1558/jld.33139.
  13. Hord, Levi C.R. (2016). "Bucking the Linguistic Binary: Gender Neutral Language in English, Swedish, French, and German". Western Papers in Linguistics / Cahiers linguistiques de Western. 3 – via Scholarship@Western.
  14. Sparks, Tori Anna (2017). "This is a Closed Space for Queer Identifying Folx": Queer Spaces on Campus. Honors Thesis (Thesis). Oberlin College.
  15. Lindsey, Treva B. (2016). "The #BlackFeministFiyah Re-Up: An Introduction". The Black Scholar: Journal of Black Studies and Research. 46 (2): 1–4. doi:10.1080/00064246.2016.1147931.
  16. Spitzer, Dalice Marie (2011). Understanding My Body as Monstrous: Feminism, the Transsexual Body, & the Rhetoric of Monstrosity. Dissertation. Chicago, IL: Roosevelt University: Roosevelt University.
  17. Hitchins, Jessi (2017). Entanglements of Sexualities and Genders within Higher Education Employees and Policies. Dissertation. Tuscaloosa, AL: University of Alabama.
  18. Brettschneider, Marla; Burgess, Susan; Keating, Christine (2017). LGBTQ Politics: A Critical Reader. p. 40. ISBN 9781479893874.
  19. Sparks, Tory (2016–2017). This is a Closed Space for Queer-Identifying Folx (Thesis).
  20. Martin, Alexandrea (2018). Challenging Corrections: Empowering LGBTQ Folx (BA Thesis).
  21. Procter, Jenna-Lee (May 10, 2018). "Rethinking disability: The need to rethink representation". African Journal of Disability. 7: 498. doi:10.4102/ajod.v7i0.498. PMC 5968877.

 

  1.  

 

 

 

From https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/439443/where-did-folx-originate

Quote

...How weird, Google ngrams will give a graph for "folx" and it had high usage in 1800s but I can’t find a citable definition for it...

Quote

...According to Word Spy lexicographer Paul McFedries, the term "folx" has existed for "at least a century".1 According to McFredies, the first published use of "folx" appeared in 2001 in a blog post written by BiNet Los Angeles board member and owner of GirlFags.com Clare in describing her identity as well as other queer identities.2 The first documented definition of "folx" appeared in 2006, when an individual named Ranmoth provided a definition of "folx" on Urban Dictionary...

 

From https://askanonbinary.tumblr.com/post/178593413151/hey-how-come-some-people-use-folx-instead-of

 

Quote

Anonymous asked:

Hey! How come some people use “folx” instead of “folks” when folks is already a gender neutral word?

 

 

 

Folks is a general catch-all term for any group of people at large. Folx was created specifically to refer to a group of queer/non-cishet people. Folx is meant specifically as a term for people with gender/sexuality politicized identities, not just a catch-all for all people in general!

 

https://forfolxsake.com/what-does-the-term-folx-mean/

 

 

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Acing It
17 hours ago, LeChat said:

Ooh, I've just clicked on the link I gave, months ago, again, and saw from the page that, apparently, a user chose to delete all of the info on the page. (So, I guess someone didn't like or agree with what was written on the page; it's rude, though, to delete all of that info and links that others gave and spent all of that time, gathering information, and for one person to decide for others what they should or shouldn't get to read for themselves. There's been a long history of queer POC having their history, thoughts, ideas, etc. erased by others who aren't queer or POC).

 

Basically, it discussed how some queer, POC (people of color) came to use the term. But, it also mentioned the term first being used in the 1800s, which I found interesting and important, as it seems that some people seem to think it was a recently invented, made-up word by queer POC.

 

Sorry, for the long post, but I've tried to gather some of the links for you and others and quoted some, in case any of those pages get deleted, too.

 

Oh, I found a cache of the page.

 

https://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:zyboHAkHBF8J:https://en.everybodywiki.com/Folx_(term)+&cd=16&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us

 

 

  1.  

 

 

 

From https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/439443/where-did-folx-originate

 

From https://askanonbinary.tumblr.com/post/178593413151/hey-how-come-some-people-use-folx-instead-of

 

 

https://forfolxsake.com/what-does-the-term-folx-mean/

 

 

Thank you!

It's wikipedia. I've corrected things on there before (foolishly in retrospect) only for them to revert back to the incomplete/incorrect version the day after. I can't be bothered with it anymore now. Wikipedia is only as good as the biggest numpty messing it up in my opinion.

 

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