Next-Level Consciousness

Living a Moneyless Life

Recommended Posts

Next-Level Consciousness

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/blog/2010/jun/02/mark-boyle-moneyless-man-food-for-free

 

I read this article about a guy who lived without money. I want to do that because I dedicated my life to financial poverty! I can also "play" (aka have experiences through adventuring) with friends who may want to do this with me. If I pass away in the process, at least I did so while on a grand adventure!

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hohohocalist

I've been in a somewhat similar process myself. I'm investing trust and support in the universe, as it's willing and able to support my journey and my mission here, and I'm investing trust in myself to live in the will of the divine, with the ability to manifest what I need to in line with that. I know that regardless of the outcome, I'll be far more abundant, connected, and grateful than most people will have the grace and ability to access (at least, in this lifetime), and I'm incredibly thankful for that and whatever comes of my life and whatever I'm able to offer to others in that journey.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ameline257

Sure if you want to. I can't tell if your being serious or not.

 

Personally I have no desire to relive my childhood and would like to stay as far away from the poverty line as I can.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
alienanteater

Being homeless was mostly fun for me. It's very hard to damn near impossible to do the type of artwork I want from that standpoint, though. I feel like it gave me a lot of perspective, and I've pretty much just decided to accept it if I'm thrust in that situation again.

 

Hell, known people that actually do have money they are saving somewhere but choose to live homeless because they like it.

 

If you are living in a crappy area with crack everywhere, well that's probably not too much fun. At least being homeless gives you the ability to travel.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hohohocalist
1 minute ago, Ameline257 said:

Sure if you want to. I can't tell if your being serious or not.

 

Personally I have no desire to relive my childhood and would like to stay as far away from the poverty line as I can.

I understand this perspective, and if I may, I'd like to speak to my experience to maybe give context for why I personally identify with this:

I was raised in not-so-great circumstances, and as a result, I face challenges now that have prevented me from living a conventional, healthy life (at least, as I was living before). I pushed myself incredibly hard to get out of the situations I found myself in, and unfortunately, the stress and the unresolved trauma and relationship with self had caused me to regress to a point where I was unable to work or study or do much of anything without any and all of it taking a severe mental, physical toll on me.

I started on my spiritual journey some time in all of that, and I realized that at this point in my life, it would be near impossible to go forth by acting in the world and "making things happen", and so I went inward, working on myself and changing my relationship with things. Not as an apologist for those who have been abusive and shitty, but so I can cope more readily with the world and my place in it. In that process, I found great solace and understanding in my capacity to do what I CAN do, as well as in my environment and the support that I do have to allow me the necessities to make a better life for myself, with what I have been capable of.

It took a SHITTON of work, but at this point, I've been in a really positive place. My mental and physical health are better, and to the point where I'm able to get back out into the world, potentially work if I need to, and do what it is that I want to create in my life (and be the person capable of creating those results). In that, though, I've realized that I find comfort and peace in living a more minimalistic life, not necessarily austere to the point of constant insecurity, but minimal enough to be line with "trusting in the way of things/the universe/spirit/etc.". At this point, regardless of my financial situation or physical environment, I know that I will NEVER feel as empty and impoverished and helpless as I felt in those times where I didn't have control over my situation. I accept that I may not be able to control as much as I would have liked to in the past, and I find peace in knowing that I can control my relationship with everything, and that's more than enough, so long as I allow it to be.

A lot of these beliefs and ideas are in line with Buddhist teachings, which I often find myself embracing. With that being said, I absolutely get that it's not that easy to just... jump into believing these things, and there's massive validity in the feelings you experience and express in relation to this. I don't want people to just accept trauma and shitty circumstances, and I'm a big proponent of doing work to help that. But I've gotten to the point in my journey where this level of trust has become a part of my process of changing my relationship to past circumstances and my feelings and reactions to them. Not to say that that path is for everybody or that it's right, but it's what I find solace in for the time being, and if the situation or my life or I call for it, I'd be more than willing to change it all. Even if that means working and living a life as conventional as feasibly possible at this point in my life. And for the time being, I'm here and learning to be happy and abundance regardless of my financial situation or physical surroundings.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Grimalkin

I met a guy who did this. He did pretty well for himself, as a young white guy with no health problems. He lived a nomadic life, brought with him only what he could carry, did odd jobs or sold trinkets he made himself for food. The whole idea was very romantic.

 

But it's not really sustainable as you get older, sadly. As your joints wear out and you get less visually appealing and people are more likely to steer clear of you than be charmed by you. Suddenly you're 50+ and achy and don't have any retirement or anywhere to sleep consistently.

 

I think it's a fine thing to do when you're 23 and want to take a gap year and try an adventure. But it's less of an adventure and more like just barely getting by when you're older. You've got to be careful that your adventure doesn't turn into genuine homelessness.

 

Minimalism might be a better approach.

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Next-Level Consciousness

Update:

I forgot to tell you guys why this has occurred in my life. Well, it started to build itself into my life yesterday. I was watching a live webinar where a guy, Victor Oddo, was describing how he and his friend, Aaron Doughty, built a 6 figure career with YouTube. I asked some questions and neither Victor nor Aaron even acknowledged my existence, yet seemed to be acknowledging everyone else's. It made me uneasy at first but then I realized that, if my worth will not be recognized there, it will be elsewhere. I must add, too, that I learned absolutely NOTHING from this webinar. So, I figured I'd pursue a meaningful life WITHOUT money that WITH money. After all, if you think you need money to have an abundant life, are you really free? I thought I'd go to the Queer Student Alliance to ease the tension. That didn't really help, as I wasn't too welcome there. My personality didn't match those of everyone there, so I left and now I live in a cemetery.

 

1 hour ago, Ameline257 said:

I can't tell if your being serious or not.

Oh yes, I'm being VERY serious!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ficto.
4 hours ago, The Angel of Eternity said:

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/blog/2010/jun/02/mark-boyle-moneyless-man-food-for-free

 

I read this article about a guy who lived without money. I want to do that because I dedicated my life to financial poverty! I can also "play" (aka have experiences through adventuring) with friends who may want to do this with me. If I pass away in the process, at least I did so while on a grand adventure!

This article didn't actually talk about much other than food, which is one of the most easily attainable things for free. Everything else, like where you sleep, the land you live on, the clothes you wear, heck even transport (and I say this as someone who doesn't drive at all) do end up costing money unless you're extremely, extremely knowledgeable about survival. I'm just interested to know what he did for everything else? Because when I was homeless, many of us still needed to scrounge money for things other than food, and relied a lot on people (churches, the local homeless shelter, public washroooms etc) to fill very basic needs which really couldn't be met without some kind of source of income. And I mean hey, if you've bought your own little patch of land to build a house on, that's great. But, you still need money to buy that. And you need the housing permits and the building equipment/recourses etc unless you're incredibly resourceful when it comes to building (very few people are), or is he sleeping in the forest?. Then there's clothes, is he skip diving for clothes? I'm just interested to know about everything other than food because as someone who has lived with no money and been homeless in the past, food is definitely the easiest and most available thing to get for free. It's everything else that gets tricky.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ameline257
5 hours ago, Ficto. said:

This article didn't actually talk about much other than food, which is one of the most easily attainable things for free. Everything else, like where you sleep, the land you live on, the clothes you wear, heck even transport (and I say this as someone who doesn't drive at all) do end up costing money unless you're extremely, extremely knowledgeable about survival. I'm just interested to know what he did for everything else? Because when I was homeless, many of us still needed to scrounge money for things other than food, and relied a lot on people (churches, the local homeless shelter, public washroooms etc) to fill very basic needs which really couldn't be met without some kind of source of income. And I mean hey, if you've bought your own little patch of land to build a house on, that's great. But, you still need money to buy that. And you need the housing permits and the building equipment/recourses etc unless you're incredibly resourceful when it comes to building (very few people are), or is he sleeping in the forest?. Then there's clothes, is he skip diving for clothes? I'm just interested to know about everything other than food because as someone who has lived with no money and been homeless in the past, food is definitely the easiest and most available thing to get for free. It's everything else that gets tricky.

Not to mention that depending on where you live, the chances of something bad happening to you are greater. Also if your a minority or a women, your in for a rough time. If you think relying on other peoples sympathy is a good system, your in for a shock. As I don't think too many people actually think/care about homelessness...in fact you will be treated as less then dirt. Sure you may be able to get into a homeless shelter but you can't stay in one forever. 

 

Each their own I guess....it just seems like the guy in the article makes homelessness out to be a fun adventurer... it really isn't. Unless you think it is an adventure trying to find shelter in a snow storm and having people ignore you. Or try to assault you, because who is going to miss another homeless person?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ficto.
1 hour ago, Ameline257 said:

Not to mention that depending on where you live, the chances of something bad happening to you are greater. Also if your a minority or a women, your in for a rough time. If you think relying on other peoples sympathy is a good system, your in for a shock. As I don't think too many people actually think/care about homelessness...in fact you will be treated as less then dirt. Sure you may be able to get into a homeless shelter but you can't stay in one forever. 

 

Each their own I guess....it just seems like the guy in the article makes homelessness out to be a fun adventurer... it really isn't. Unless you think it is an adventure trying to find shelter in a snow storm and having people ignore you. Or try to assault you, because who is going to miss another homeless person?

Yeah the article really didn't cover enough to know way or another what this man is actually doing. Does he mean he just didn't spend money on food, but stayed in a safe home, or what? :o 

 

I am hoping that @The Angel of Eternity will be able to give some more info!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Anthracite_Impreza

Can't have cars without money, so massive NOPE.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lucinda

You live in a cemetery in SLC where night time temps are at or below freezing?  Are you sleeping in your car?  

 

Lucinda

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
chandrakirti

George Orwell live 'down and out in London and Paris' while researching poverty in the 1930s. 

He was able to draw attention to the massive inequalities that'll probably always exist ....and caught the TB that shortened his life, in that process.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sally

In the County where I live, we have 12,000 people who must live on the streets because they can't afford homes, and most are constantly ill-fed.  That is not an ideal milieu for attaining spiritual awakening.   It's hard to read four paragraphs about how wonderful it is or would be to live without money without wondering who's paying for your food and clothes.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
uhtred

Doesn't living without money mean that you are relying on others to support you if you need medical care, and possibly for food and shelter as well - unless you work some sort of barter system.  It may be possible to get free food and shelter, but that doesn't mean that those things didn't cost someone *else*. 

 

What are you doing for everyone else to hold up your part of society?  Isn't it a moral obligation for everyone who is able to to contribute to society, and not just let others care for them?

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ardoise
16 hours ago, uhtred said:

 

 

What are you doing for everyone else to hold up your part of society?  Isn't it a moral obligation for everyone who is able to to contribute to society, and not just let others care for them?

 

 

Plenty of societies in human history have let people go off on adventures for the sake of science, God, or just seeing whether it actually is possible to climb that mountain.

As long as too many people don't do it at once, it can benefit the group as a whole, if the wanderer survives to bring back insights.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sally
17 minutes ago, Ardoise said:

Plenty of societies in human history have let people go off on adventures for the sake of science, God, or just seeing whether it actually is possible to climb that mountain.

As long as too many people don't do it at once, it can benefit the group as a whole, if the wanderer survives to bring back insights.

And when they go off on those adventures, or pursue science, or God, or climb mountains, someone has to provide their food, clothing, and shelter.  That all costs money, and this thread is talking about living without money.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
uhtred
On 12/7/2018 at 3:26 PM, Ardoise said:

Plenty of societies in human history have let people go off on adventures for the sake of science, God, or just seeing whether it actually is possible to climb that mountain.

As long as too many people don't do it at once, it can benefit the group as a whole, if the wanderer survives to bring back insights.

Societies do sometimes agree that its worth the cost (eg money) for someone to be the first to climb Everest, go to the South Pole, or the moon.  Wealthy patrons may pay for someone to travel to foreign lands to bring back valuable information.  They may pay skilled artists etc. 

Most of the people who did those things were funded because of their extraordinary abilities.   Marco Polo,  Amundsen, Armstrong, etc. were the best of the best at what they do.  I have no skill that would have it make sense for Society to pay to send me on some adventure rather than send someone better qualified - so I work a normal job (which I happen to enjoy) as my contribution.



 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
uhtred
On 12/7/2018 at 9:29 PM, Next-Level Consciousness said:

I can't really agree with: 

6. Our community provides for all its members the necessities of a healthy, fulfilling and sustainable life, freely and without obligation.

 

I want society to provide necessities for those that cannot provide for themselves, but I don't want a world where some people feel free to not contribute, despite being able to, and live off the effort of others.  That doesn't seem fair. 

 

Shouldn't everyone contribute to an extent compatible with their abilities?

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thea2
36 minutes ago, uhtred said:

...  Our community provides for all its members the necessities of a healthy, fulfilling and sustainable life, freely and without obligation.

 

My idea of a total nightmare. I have already grown up, I can look after myself. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thea2
6 hours ago, Next-Level Consciousness said:

Jeeves: We have a duty to look after our ladies and gentlemen, Monsieur Anatole.

Monsieur Anatole: Look after?! Am I the nursie for the kiddies?! No, this is not kiddies, no no no no no.”

(P.G. Wodehouse)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gloomy

"There's no such thing as a free lunch" because ultimately, somebody's gotta pay for it. It might be free to you, but not free to everyone else.

 

If someone chooses to provide for someone and get little to nothing in return then more power to them, but not everyone will be willing to do that.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
daveb

Yeah, there must be some sort of support at some level. Or if people are living "off the land", raising and/or foraging for their food, creating shelter from found materials such as tree branches, etc., what happens when they are no longer able to do that for whatever reason? I don't see how it would be sustainable for an entire adult lifetime, nor on a wide scale by large numbers of people. Seems like at best it could only be a temporary situation (or adventure, if you like).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now