scarletlatitude

New AVENues Issue: Style

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scarletlatitude

Hello hello hello! :) 

 

The next issue of AVENues is here! This issue was all about style. 

 

View online here: https://issuu.com/avenues1/docs/avenues-magazine-autumn-2018 

 

Download: http://bit.ly/avenues-autumn-2018-download

Download compressed file (for those whose computers cannot handle the other download): http://bit.ly/avenues-autumn-2018-download-compressed 

 

 

 

Special thanks as always to our awesome staff:

 

Editor in chief: @scarletlatitude

Layout: @ThinkNotVanilla

Content editors: @Blue Ice-Tea @Snao Cone @kelico @addewyn @Biblioromantic

Creative team: @SkyWorld @kelico @addewyn

 

Contributors: @Snao Cone @scarletlatitude @kelico @Rosendust @Scott1989 @Blue Ice-Tea @Zebigbos Hady, Tobi Emanuel 

 

Special thanks to: @[noize:injekktion]

 

 

====================

 

Our last issue for 2018 is about asexuality and education. (Yep. Sex ed. We’re going there.) What was your sex ed experience? Did you ever learn about asexuality (or any other orientations)?If not, how did you learn about it? Did you feel accepted when you were in school?

 

Fill out our questions of the month form here: https://goo.gl/forms/BQrFWJnBIJVHOddm2

 

Remember, we are always looking for articles and artwork to add to AVENues!

 

You can also send your submissions to any member of the AVENues staff linked above. :) 

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Nowhere Girl

The poll assumes that people have had sex ed in schools. In some countries it's not obvious...

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InquisitivePhilosopher
29 minutes ago, Nowhere Girl said:

The poll assumes that people have had sex ed in schools. In some countries it's not obvious...

Oh, wow. I thought Poland required it, too. Many countries around the world made it mandatory in schools to prevent the spread of AIDS. But, I remember, even in the U.S., parents were allowed to remove their children from those classes; for example, my parents only had me go to one sex ed class, in fifth grade, but removed me from the eighth grade sex ed class, partly because she thought it'd be a repeat of sex ed stuff I'd already learned because, in the school district (in a different state), that might've been the first time they'd teach sex ed to students, in eighth grade, rather than in fifth.

 

https://www.humanityinaction.org/knowledgebase/214-love-your-neighbor-but-not-too-much-political-and-religious-involvement-in-sex-education-within-polish-public-schools

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Scorporal
7 hours ago, Nowhere Girl said:

The poll assumes that people have had sex ed in schools. In some countries it's not obvious...

There's little sex ed here in South Asia, but the spread of AIDS is discussed in biology (high school bio) and so is its prevention, so I guess that's what's important. But that's about it. No discussion on orientation at all (being non-heterosexual is taboo).

But I'm GLAAD (get it?) that these reforms are being put forward. I hope asexual education reaches out place soon for the next generation.

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Nowhere Girl

There's almost no sex ed here, the issue is still considered "controversial" and conservatives use demagogic methods to show it as "sexualisation of children". There is only the horrible, very biased ersatz called "family education" - fortunately, I had nothing to do with it, I finished school before it was introduced. But I can recall a situation relevant to this topic. It was at the Equality Parade (Warsaw pride event) - I saw a girl in an "ask a sex ed teacher" T-shirt and I felt compelled to ask her about asexuality. And her answer was unpleasantly evasive. She said things in the line of "of course people shouldn't have sex they don't want to have, and any teacher should say it to their students... but still, asexuality is not officially recognised as an orientation". This made me realise that education about asexuality in fact needs to be proactive, not reactive - otherwise a lot of aces who don't know their orientation and struggle with their feelings will miss a chance of discovering asexuality.

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scarletlatitude
On 9/1/2018 at 8:13 PM, Nowhere Girl said:

The poll assumes that people have had sex ed in schools. In some countries it's not obvious...

Then write a thing for us! We want to hear stories! :) You are absolutely right that we do not know what is going on everywhere. Let us know what we don't know. 

 

You can send it to any AVENues member via pm or email us. (newsletter@asexuality.org or avenues.submissions@gmail.com) 

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Katto

I come from America, specifically the South, the land of (stereotypically) homophobes, hard Christianity, and humidity. Here, we have extensive sex ed. I’ve had it in 5th and 6th grades, and in my Unitarian Universalist church. In the church one, they taught me about pronouns, gender, and sexual orientations (unlike in the school ones). That’s actually where I learned about asexuality! :) 

 

Also, I haven’t been to HS yet, so what nightmares lay there?

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scoobysasha

I live in Canada and well we started talking about puberty in grade 5, sex was brought up in grade seven. The nurse who came in told us how kissing was supply to feel 'good' and the way she said thing made me feel uncomfortable. At that point I didn't know what asexuality was, but I did know that I wasn't really interested despite already 'reaching' that point in puberty (up until then I'd been telling myself I'd feel it eventually). She also told us about some NSFW thing that I won't be getting into. It was then brought up again in Grade 9 where we were divided up by our sex and we went more in-depth into relationships. I remember almost crying when the teacher said all relationships start with sexual attraction. It only made me feel more broken then I'd already been feeling. 

 

Sexuality or gender identity was never discussed in any of our sex-ed lessons, like they assumed we were all cishet. Of course, now my Province has recently switched to a curriculum from mid-90s so I suppose the class was at least lucky to have been taught about safe sex. 

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kiaroskuro
On 9/2/2018 at 10:44 AM, Nowhere Girl said:

There's almost no sex ed here, the issue is still considered "controversial" and conservatives use demagogic methods to show it as "sexualisation of children".

Reminds me of how our German sex education reform sparked a public outcry a while ago, because the new curriculums cover LGBT+ topics (sexual and gender diversity), and conservative parents took to the street, claiming they were against the 'early sexualization' of children, among other things.

What's more, the far-right party which holds seats in our federal parliament is very vocal about returning to teach 'classical family values'. Needless to say, they despise proponents of diversity, feminism, LGBT+ rights, not to mention ethnic minorities.

I'm thinking about writing a short article about this whole issue, provided that it's of interest? I'm not sure if I'll be able to commit myself to it, but I think I'd enjoy researching into this topic.

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scarletlatitude

Doin a cross post: https://www.asexuality.org/en/topic/176520-short-stories-for-avenues/

 

 

We are looking for short stories for a new short story corner. See submission info in the link above. :) 

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Gofigure

Had sex-ed in6th grade in 1966, ,at 11 y/o. I thought it was sad and innappropriate, but necessary for not getting pregnant,yet leaving all the responsibility to women to take birth control or be the one to insist on condoms. The part that was not taught but understood later on, was that men were to have as many sexual escapades as possible,  but women were sluts if they weren't virgins before marriage. If you didn't marry by 30, you were a "spinster". But men were just "confirmed bachelors,....always eligible"...like it was a badge of honor with each conquest. Very sexist propaganda for an innocent 11 year old.  Nothing about love and respect for each other in that video, just "Here is the vagina. The penis goes into the vagina. If the male does not wear a condom, the female could get pregnant or get disease" ....women were incubators and men had no responsibility for any consequences.I felt the exploitation of my sex before I ever had it and it was something I was expected to do if I wanted to be loved. Don't get me wrong, I liked sex when it was mutual.  My mother taught us that love, marriage and sex happened in that order. There was never a choice for a Good girl. Everyone I speak to about this says. " intimacy is about sex. No man is going to have a relationship if you do not have sex " The sad truth is as women get older,Men want younger and younger women. So, where does that leave older women who want life wth or without sex who are divorced or single?  Children under the age of 10 should be taught they will have sexual urges, strange feelings in their bodies as they get older and not to be afraid. Anatomy and psychology of sex and loveshould be taught gently but objectively, and by same sex teachers that have specific qualfications in psychology of adolescent growth and development.  Kids this age shouldn't be shown a generic, cold vivid enactment of sexual intercourse in the 6th grade.  Certainly, if it were a federal law for men to take legal and financial responsibility for a pregnancy right along with women, more men would wear condoms. The longer I am single, ( divorced on purpose to save my sanity and self respect after 25 years of trying), the more open my eyes are to possibilities of living a more authentic life.

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Rachelink

I never had sex ed as I was home schooled. I found out though about sex in other ways. I guess when you reach a certain age you see enough to learn about it. Not that complicated hehe

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_Julia_

My school never taught sex Ed. I went to a private catholic school. The closest we got was maybe a day where our religions teacher was talking about saving sex for after marriage and that sort of stuff. I stopped paying attention as soon as she brought up the topic of gays. I found that class/teacher to be annoying. She was all like God loves everyone and I don't hate gays but you shouldn't be gay, that's bad. I'm like okay so you don't hate gays but you do. (Sorry for the small rant)

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