Life Of Tass

Etymology of lith- orientations?

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Life Of Tass

I'm just here to ask about the etymology of lith- orientations.

 

Like, asexuality is pretty straight forward. A- (meaning no or lack of) and sexuality. Demisexuality is straight forward as well. Demi- (meaning half) and sexuality. Fraysexuality as well. Fray is something fading over time. Even apothisexuality (name for explicitly sex-repulsed asexuals), as "apotho" is the greek translation of "to repulse". But lithsexuality (?) and lithromanticism? If you go by greek translation again, lith is remeniscent of "lithos", meaning stone. Is that what it is, or is it another thing entirely? I'm just genuinely curious, as I'm pretty interested in etymology in general. Sorry if this is the wrong place to post such a question.

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Nowhere Girl

I have no idea too and I'm interested in knowing it.

All I can say is that I don't like when supposedly scientific, or at least quasi-scientific terms are made with morphemes from all possible languages. OK - mixing Latin and Greek has long been established in scientific language, but mixing Latin or Greek with English is not so good. So, for example, "androromantic" is correct, "maromantic" is bad term-building.

"Apothisexual" seems to be very rarely used, even when it's a well-built word. Probably because it doesn't have single-word counterparts and so "I'm apothisexual" is very rare, "I'm sex-repulsed" is way more common and a clear counterpart to "sex-averse", "sex-indifferent" and "sex-favorable".

 

I mix Latin or Greek with completely different languages (well, maybe not "completely different"... English, German, Polish and so on are all distant cousins of Latin, Greek and Sanskrit within the same great Indo-European family and it can actually still be seen in grammatic structures and very basic words... I was quite amazed how much the Indian phrase "Tat tvam asi" reminds me of English, Polish and Latin words...) mostly for the purposes of creating non-serious "terms". Example: "władzoseksualny" (Polish), which could be translated as "power-sexual" - it refers to a person in which desire for political power has mostly replaced sexuality. Example: the Belarusian dictator Alexander Lukashenka... still formally married, but in de facto separation with his wife; then he had an affair with his personal doctor - but mostly, it seems, he needed her in order to produce a new, younger heir (his legitimate sons have already become "too old"). Afterwards he sent her away because he doesn't seem to need a woman, he just wanted to be a father again and cares about the dynasty. Poor Kolya... I hope he at least makes his father a bad prank and embraces democracy after his father's death.

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Bloc

I don't have much knowledge of lesbian history. But what I learned is that lesbians who like to pleasure their partners in sex, but don't want to be pleasured sexually, are called stone. Where is comes from I don't know. Was the term coined with the book "Stone Butch Blues" or is it older?

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