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Muledeer

Growing Your Own: What did you grow / raise / harvest?

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SkyenAutowegCaptain

@pickles mcgee, we're lucky around here. (I live in the same county as @Tunhope), and there's a huge variety of fruit tree stock around. East Malling Horticultural Research Centre has a greater variety of trees than anywhere else in the world. 

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timewarp

I'm lucky enough to have an apple tree in my garden (lucky because I'm renting a flat, so this is a bit of a luxury). This year it's full of rather tasty apples. Some of the bushes in my garden are completely taken over by blackberries. So in July/August I had plenty of blackberries, immediately followed by apples.

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daveb

I have 2 apple trees in my backyard, currently so loaded with apples many of the branches are drooping almost to the ground. But they are not good apples for consumption. There are also strawberry plants, but they seem to produce rather tasteless strawberries. I guess these were either meant to only be decorative or someone didn't pick good varieties for edibility. Even the local wildlife doesn't seem to go for them.

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Tunhope

That's right @pickles mcgee  and @Muledeer l love damsons. They are small, purplish and very tart ( not sweet) . I really like damson jam. Gages are green and sooooh sweet. Lovely! Trouble is that the wasps like the gages too. I hadnt  realised that the names hadn't crossed the ocean. ( edited after I saw Muledeer post below so looks out of order!)

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Muledeer
2 hours ago, daveb said:

Even the local wildlife doesn't seem to go for them.

If even the animals reject your homegrown fruits, they must be pretty bland.  I imagine you could add a bunch of sugar and make jelly, but why bother.  Speaking of jelly, the wild chokecherries around here are ripe and ready to pick.  

 

I'm glad @pickles mcgee translated gages and damsons as I have never heard those names for plums.

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Tunhope

I always get a little confused over jam and jelly. I think that when I say jam, I mean jelly to everyone in the US ( not sure about in Canada and other American countries) Jelly to me is a rubbery  fruity dessert made with boiling water then left to set.

Blackberries freeze well @timewarp if you've any left

 

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SkyenAutowegCaptain

@Tunhope, I think jam and jelly in Britain are a bit weird. As you say, there's fruit jelly which is a dessert, but apples and blackberries make jelly, whilst strawberries and blackcurrants make jam

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Muledeer

I've always called anything with chunks of fruit in it a jam and if it is made only from the boiled broth of the fruit, it is a jelly.   My only known use of either a jam or a jelly is to make a slice of  bread taste better.

@Tunhope, @SkyenAutowegCaptain when discussing jelly, are you referring to gelatin deserts, like Jell-O?

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Tunhope

I was @Muledeer  .Jelly to me has gelatin ( I've never actually had jell -O but I think I know what you mean)) I think  that @SkyenAutowegCaptain was referring to a weirdness in UK usage though. For some reason, we sometimes call apple jam apple jelly even though it's a normal jam not a gelatin- based product.

 

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InquisitivePhilosopher

:( My only peach tree seems to dying. I grew it from seed, which had taken around three or four years.

 

And my only orange tree isn't doing well, either, with leaves turning black. It's also a very young tree, that never had fruit on it. I'm disappointed because it takes a long time to grow them, make sure they have enough water, etc., and they hadn't even grown fruit for me to try, yet.

 

Still, at least I still have a couple of my apple trees, left (that are also a few years old and haven't grown any apples, yet).

 

But, I really would like to have a variety of fruit trees.

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daveb
1 hour ago, Muledeer said:

your homegrown fruits, they must be pretty bland. 

Yep, bland is the word for it.

 

Similar to what Muledeer said, to me Jelly is a kind of spread that has no bits or chunks of fruit, usually clear (but colored of course), while jams do have bits of fruit or at least enough fruit substance to be a bit more opaque. Then there are preserves, which are generally more chunky. And marmelades, made from citrus peels. And "butters", like apple butter, which is not made with dairy and is not like regular butter.

 

PBJ (aka peanut butter and jelly) sandwiches are not made with gelatin/jello (but could be made with jam). :P 

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Muledeer

I never knew that about preserves or marmelades.  This is an interesting discussion.  What about pudding?  I only think of a pudding as a sweet desert, but there is Yorkshire pudding in the UK, and I believe is more savory in nature but I'm not sure how it is eaten.

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SkyenAutowegCaptain

@Muledeer, a Yorkshire pudding is fried or roasted batter, traditionally served with roast beef and covered with gravy. Bigger ones can be filled with stew. 

There's also suet pudding, which can contain bacon and are served as a main course. 

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Tunhope

I think that the idea was that large quantities of meat were scarce, so the Yorkshire people would cook what meat they had directly on a spit or on the bars of the oven, and the meat juices would drip onto/ into the batter below. 

I might have got jelly as described by @daveb wrong. I can't imagine spreading what I think of as jelly on anything. You can pour it into moulds and then turn it out onto a plate when it's set. 

I'm sorry about your trees @InquisitivePhilosopher  especially as you've grown some from seed. That requires a lot of patience. It's a shame they're not doing well. Incidentally, I love your rainbow fish.

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daveb
3 hours ago, Tunhope said:

I might have got jelly as described by @daveb wrong. I can't imagine spreading what I think of as jelly on anything. You can pour it into moulds and then turn it out onto a plate when it's set.

That's the difference between UK jelly and US jelly. What you call jelly, we call jello. :P 

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