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#1 Jillianimal

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Posted 04 November 2011 - 12:45 AM

In case the title isn't self-explanatory enough, I think we should try to get the "person who doesn't experience sexual attraction" wedged into the dictionary, but worded more carefully to see it as a valid orientation than a "I'm kind of asexual today" description. Does anyone know how this can be done? Do we write a letter or petition to...whoever is in charge of publishing dictionaries? Would that do anything at all or do they just do this stuff themselves?
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#2 Lord Happy Toast

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Posted 04 November 2011 - 12:56 AM

Merriam-Webster Online has a page on How does a word get into a Merriam-Webster dictionary?

The OED has an FAQ page that is worth looking at. The issue here would be adding a new sense for a word:

I've made up a word. Please add it to the OED.
Many correspondents seem to regard getting a word into ‘the dictionary’ as a sure route to fame and even fortune. They are often disappointed to hear that the process of adding any new word, or a new sense of an existing word, is long and painstaking, and depends on the accumulation of a large body of published (preferably printed) citations showing the word in actual use over a period of at least ten years. Once a word is added to the OED it is never removed; OED provides a permanent record of its place in the language. The idea is that a puzzled reader encountering an unfamiliar word in, say, a 1920s novel, will be able to find the word in the OED even if it has been little used for the past fifty years. Our smaller dictionaries of current English, such as the Oxford Dictionary of English and the Concise Oxford English Dictionary, tend to include new vocabulary more rapidly. These dictionaries are designed to be as up to date as possible, and are frequently revised, but their new entries are usually based on the same solid body of evidence.

What is a ‘non-word’?
It is something of a misnomer to call words not yet in the OED ‘non-words’. They are simply words that we have not included up to this point because we have not yet seen sufficient evidence of their usage. Some of these words may appear in other dictionaries which deal with current English, and which do not have an obligation to illustrate usage. The OED is unique, however, not only in never removing a word once it has been included, but also because we illustrate each entry with real evidence taken from a very wide range of print sources.

How does a word qualify for inclusion in the OED?
The OED requires several independent examples of the word being used, and also evidence that the word has been in use for a reasonable amount of time. The exact time-span and number of examples may vary: for instance, one word may be included on the evidence of only a few examples, spread out over a long period of time, while another may gather momentum very quickly, resulting in a wide range of evidence in a shorter space of time. We also look for the word to reach a level of general currency where it is unselfconsciously used with the expectation of being understood: that is, we look for examples of uses of a word that are not immediately followed by an explanation of its meaning for the benefit of the reader. We have a large range of words under constant review, and as items are assessed for inclusion in the dictionary, words which have not yet accumulated enough evidence are kept on file, so that we can refer back to them if further evidence comes to light.

How can I send evidence of a new word or sense to the OED?
We can assess examples of new words and senses that are not illustrated in the OED, providing the information is sent through the OED Online website, in the appropriate form. This captures the quotation and its accompanying citation details, and transmits the information in a format that our editing system can interpret, which therefore enables our editors to make use of the evidence.



#3 Ace Amoeba

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Posted 04 November 2011 - 04:51 AM

It's all about how much the word is used in media(e.g. "doh" by Homer Simpson was added to the dictionary a fee years back). With the internet, everything changed as words popped up more frequently. If someone were to make a solid effort, I'm sure asexual could be added to the dictionary with ease.

#4 Jillianimal

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Posted 05 November 2011 - 02:38 AM

I don't think length of time of asexual being used in this way is an issue since AVEN's been around for 10 years. Also the fact that New York & Vermont have it written in a law that asexuality is considered a sexual orientation I'm sure would help a lot. So I guess the real obstacle to get past is how often it's used. There's also the issue of trying to ensure that the definition is something that's enduring as any other orientation (the fact that some people see it as a lack of orienation because it's about lacking attraction doesn't help much). Any ideas with that?
"No, my friend. We are lunatics from the hospital up the highway, psycho-ceramics, the cracked pots of mankind. Would you like me to decipher a Rorschach for you? No? You must hurry on? Ah, he's gone. Pity." ~ Dale Harding (One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest [the best book evah])

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#5 Lord Happy Toast

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Posted 05 November 2011 - 02:55 AM

There's also the issue of trying to ensure that the definition is something that's enduring as any other orientation (the fact that some people see it as a lack of orienation because it's about lacking attraction doesn't help much). Any ideas with that?

The issue for "enduring" isn't how enduring asexual identity/orientation is or is not in individuals over time, but how persistent (the term) "asexual" is in general usage in the sense that we mean it. Some new words (or new senses) have a flash-in-the-pan character to them, where they're popular for a short time and then die out. Because of inherent difficulties in accurately guessing what's going to catch on (long term) and what won't, the length of time is used to try to keep flash-in-the-pan items out.

#6 Cleander

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Posted 05 November 2011 - 03:04 AM

Hm, this actually sounds like it would be a cool project. Seems like the main steps required would be:

1) agree on wording for definitions, probably for asexual and asexuality. good starting points are working with AVEN's definitions, and also referring to standard dictionary definitions of bisexuality.

3) Find sources which use the word in reference to the orientation, preferably reliable print sources (ex. published books, scholarly articles maybe?) and compile a list of specific, dated references.

4) (if necessary): write several sample sentences/phrases illustrating proper use of the word. (again, looking at examples for homosexuality/bisexual/etc. provide good examples)

5)Research each dictionary's policy for submitting/accepting new words, or in this case, new senses of words. Some will be easier to change than others - for ex, I'd think wiktionary probably has a more lax policy than, say, the OED.

6) once the procedure is known, proceed to follow it - probably either submitting info online, or completing certain forms, etc. This is where having pre-made and screened definitions/examples/citations would help.

7)Repeat for each publication.


*EDIT* Actually, looks like we're already in wiktionary. Online dictionaries will be an easier place to start - I believe Merriam-Webster has an online dicitonary for new/slang words that is easier to submit to - I can look into that.

#7 Jillianimal

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Posted 05 November 2011 - 03:22 AM


There's also the issue of trying to ensure that the definition is something that's enduring as any other orientation (the fact that some people see it as a lack of orienation because it's about lacking attraction doesn't help much). Any ideas with that?

The issue for "enduring" isn't how enduring asexual identity/orientation is or is not in individuals over time, but how persistent (the term) "asexual" is in general usage in the sense that we mean it.


Mmm, true. I know I've gotten into at least one argument about asexuality meaning "lacking sexual attraction to anyone" or "not having interest in sex". People on both sides tend to be very persistent with their description.

But as for the whole enduring thing, I know dictionaries won't care about that. That doesn't really matter. What I'm concerened about is people reading the definition & thinking they're asexual for the day because it's not being clear that lacking attraction to anyone is not a periodical thing (unless the person's sexuality is fluid, but you get what I mean).
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#8 Lord Happy Toast

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Posted 05 November 2011 - 05:12 AM

For dictionaries, the question of who is "really asexual" (or even if anyone is "really asexual") is largely beside the point. What the really issue is (as far as dictionaries are concerned) is stated nicely by Mirriam-Webster:

How does a word get into a Merriam-Webster dictionary?
This is one of the questions Merriam-Webster editors are most often asked.
The answer is simple: usage.

Many people think of dictionaries as telling people how they should use language. The primary aim, by contrast, is how people actually do use language. For anyone at all familiar with linguistics, a distinction is made between descriptive and prescriptive grammar. Dictionaries aim to be the former, although many people use them for the latter, which means that attempts to do the former easily have an impact on the latter, whether the lexicographers like it or not.

#9 Jillianimal

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Posted 07 November 2011 - 10:37 PM

I looked up the sexual orientations for a sense of wording on MWO & they define them as "of, relating to, or characterized by a tendency to direct sexual desire toward _____ sex".

So I guess if we were to submit asexual as an orientation it will look like:
"of, relating to, or characterized by a tendency to direct sexual desire toward neither sex"
Looks kind of funny worded like that. Maybe "of, relating to, or characterized by a tendency of lacking sexual desire toward any sex" would work better while still being consistent.

For mondofacto: A person not sexually attracted to persons of any sex

Vocabulary: a person who is not sexually attracted to any sex

-----------------------

As for sources, I think we could use:
AVEN (obviously)
Vermont's laws protecting sexual orientation
SONDA (may be problematic since there's no definition for any of the orientations)
Relationship of Serum Testosterone Concentrations to Mate Preferences in Rams (refers to rams who showed no interest in mating with either sex as asexual)
CNN story

Lori Waite Turner, Frances Sizer Webb. 1992. Life choices: health concepts and strategies. West Pub. Co. p313
"Still other people are asexual, meaning that they are sexually attracted to neither sex." link

Michele J. Eliason. 1996. Who cares?: institutional barriers to health care for lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons. Jones & Bartlett Learning. p25-26
"Some people argue that asexual should also be included, acknowledging that some people have no sexual attractions." link

Gianna E. Israel, Donald E. Tarver, Joy Diane Shaffer. 2001. Transgender Care: Recommended Guidelines, Practical Information, and Personal Accounts. Temple University Press. p47
"Asexual individuals have no erotic attraction for others." link

A.F. Bogaert, 2004:
"Asexuality, the state of having no sexual attraction for either sex" link

Arlene Istar Lev. 2004. Transgender emergence: therapeutic guidelines for working with gender-variant people and their families. Routledge. p86
"Sexual orientation can be directed toward members of the same sex (homosexual), the opposite sex (heterosexual), both sexes (bisexual), or neither sex (asexual)." link

Ronald L. Jackson, II. 2010. Encyclopedia of Identity, Volume 1. SAGE. p65
"asexual describes those who do not experience sexual attraction"

Elizabeth J. Meyer. 2010. Gender and sexual diversity in schools: an introduction. Springer. p141
"Asexual A sexual orientation for a person who does not feel sexual attraction or experience a desire for sexual contact."link

L. A. Brotto, 2010:
"The findings suggest that asexuality is best conceptualized as a lack of sexual attraction; however, asexuals varied greatly in their experience of sexual response and behavior." link



I think they're fairly solid when it comes to sources. Anybody think that more pop culture oriented sources (though still in consistent use) would help?
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#10 Faelights

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 01:03 AM

Just throwing these possible definitions out there for consideration:

  • of, relating to, or characterized by no (particular) tendency to direct sexual desire towards any sex
  • of, relating to, or characterized by no (particular) tendency to direct sexual desire towards individuals of any sex
I noticed that the initial suggestion was "of, relating to, or characterized by a tendency to direct sexual desire towards neither sex", which could be seen to enforce a binary, which I think might be undesired for some.

#11 hexaquark

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 07:51 AM

This made me wonder... how are people outside the community defining asexuality?

So, here are definitions from an assortment of books (in a sexology-type context, not a biology-type context), ordered by year because alphabetizing is unappetizing and time is more interesting:

Spoiler


Here are some ways that some researchers in the field have recently described asexuality:

A.F. Bogaert, 2004:
"Asexuality, the state of having no sexual attraction for either sex"

N. Prause, C.A. Graham, 2007:
"Content analyses supported the idea that low sexual desire is the primary feature predicting asexual identity."

L. A. Brotto, 2010:
"The findings suggest that asexuality is best conceptualized as a lack of sexual attraction; however, asexuals varied greatly in their experience of sexual response and behavior."



There are a bunch of media pieces listed here, and there are way more of all of these things out there.

#12 Faelights

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 10:54 AM

Wow, some of these go pretty far back... cool!!!

#13 Jillianimal

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 01:32 PM

This made me wonder... how are people outside the community defining asexuality?

So, here are definitions from an assortment of books (in a sexology-type context, not a biology-type context), ordered by year because alphabetizing is unappetizing and time is more interesting:

Spoiler


Here are some ways that some researchers in the field have recently described asexuality:

A.F. Bogaert, 2004:
"Asexuality, the state of having no sexual attraction for either sex"

N. Prause, C.A. Graham, 2007:
"Content analyses supported the idea that low sexual desire is the primary feature predicting asexual identity."

L. A. Brotto, 2010:
"The findings suggest that asexuality is best conceptualized as a lack of sexual attraction; however, asexuals varied greatly in their experience of sexual response and behavior."



There are a bunch of media pieces listed here, and there are way more of all of these things out there.


This is beautiful. I'll add some of these to the list later. I shouldn't even be on right now :unsure:
"No, my friend. We are lunatics from the hospital up the highway, psycho-ceramics, the cracked pots of mankind. Would you like me to decipher a Rorschach for you? No? You must hurry on? Ah, he's gone. Pity." ~ Dale Harding (One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest [the best book evah])

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#14 Jillianimal

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 04:18 AM

Hexaquark, do you have the links to some of those references? I decided to use

Lori Waite Turner, Frances Sizer Webb. 1992. Life choices: health concepts and strategies. West Pub. Co. p313

Michele J. Eliason. 1996. Who cares?: institutional barriers to health care for lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons. Jones & Bartlett Learning. p25-26

Gianna E. Israel, Donald E. Tarver, Joy Diane Shaffer. 2001. Transgender Care: Recommended Guidelines, Practical Information, and Personal Accounts. Temple University Press. p47

A.F. Bogaert, 2004

Arlene Istar Lev. 2004. Transgender emergence: therapeutic guidelines for working with gender-variant people and their families. Routledge. p86

Jerrold S. Greenberg, Clint E. Bruess, Sarah C. Conklin. 2010. Exploring the Dimensions of Human Sexuality. Jones & Bartlett Learning. p358

Ronald L. Jackson, II. 2010. Encyclopedia of Identity, Volume 1. SAGE. p65

Elizabeth J. Meyer. 2010. Gender and sexual diversity in schools: an introduction. Springer. p141

L. A. Brotto, 2010

so that may help narrow it down (I decided to weed out the ones whose definitions weren't consistent with the others or supported misconceptions).
"No, my friend. We are lunatics from the hospital up the highway, psycho-ceramics, the cracked pots of mankind. Would you like me to decipher a Rorschach for you? No? You must hurry on? Ah, he's gone. Pity." ~ Dale Harding (One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest [the best book evah])

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#15 hexaquark

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 07:58 AM

Hexaquark, do you have the links to some of those references?

Tell me if these links don't work...

Lori Waite Turner, Frances Sizer Webb. 1992. Life choices: health concepts and strategies. West Pub. Co. p313

Michele J. Eliason. 1996. Who cares?: institutional barriers to health care for lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons. Jones & Bartlett Learning. p25-26

Gianna E. Israel, Donald E. Tarver, Joy Diane Shaffer. 2001. Transgender Care: Recommended Guidelines, Practical Information, and Personal Accounts. Temple University Press. p47

A.F. Bogaert. 2004. Asexuality: Its Prevalence and Associated Factors in a National Probability Sample. Journal of Sex Research, 41, 279-287

Arlene Istar Lev. 2004. Transgender emergence: therapeutic guidelines for working with gender-variant people and their families. Routledge. p86

Jerrold S. Greenberg, Clint E. Bruess, Sarah C. Conklin. 2010. Exploring the Dimensions of Human Sexuality. Jones & Bartlett Learning. p358

Ronald L. Jackson, II. 2010. Encyclopedia of Identity, Volume 1. SAGE. P64-65

Elizabeth J. Meyer. 2010. Gender and sexual diversity in schools: an introduction. Springer. p141

L. A. Brotto, G. Knudson, J. Inskip, K. Rhodes, Y. Erskine. 2010. Asexuality: A mixed methods approach. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 39, 599-618.

#16 PiF

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 08:36 AM

it seems to be the definition all though unliked by a few..generally works and is easily identifiable

where it goes wrong is when we add..but..or spectrum

we do have some definitions existing already..the most obvious is wikipedia and the urban dictionary

as to the recognised dictionaries..well soem we have to work on and i feel that's very much what the pt should be doing

example..collins concise english dictionary is used by most schoolss in the uk but it lists asexual as

1. having no apparent sex or sex organs,

2. (of reproduction) not involving sexual activity,
◇ adv asexually


it's places like the major dictionary providers the pt should be corresponding with to ensure the definitions are changed or updated

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#17 Jillianimal

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 03:40 AM


Hexaquark, do you have the links to some of those references?

Tell me if these links don't work...

Lori Waite Turner, Frances Sizer Webb. 1992. Life choices: health concepts and strategies. West Pub. Co. p313

Michele J. Eliason. 1996. Who cares?: institutional barriers to health care for lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons. Jones & Bartlett Learning. p25-26

Gianna E. Israel, Donald E. Tarver, Joy Diane Shaffer. 2001. Transgender Care: Recommended Guidelines, Practical Information, and Personal Accounts. Temple University Press. p47

A.F. Bogaert. 2004. Asexuality: Its Prevalence and Associated Factors in a National Probability Sample. Journal of Sex Research, 41, 279-287

Arlene Istar Lev. 2004. Transgender emergence: therapeutic guidelines for working with gender-variant people and their families. Routledge. p86

Jerrold S. Greenberg, Clint E. Bruess, Sarah C. Conklin. 2010. Exploring the Dimensions of Human Sexuality. Jones & Bartlett Learning. p358

Ronald L. Jackson, II. 2010. Encyclopedia of Identity, Volume 1. SAGE. P64-65

Elizabeth J. Meyer. 2010. Gender and sexual diversity in schools: an introduction. Springer. p141

L. A. Brotto, G. Knudson, J. Inskip, K. Rhodes, Y. Erskine. 2010. Asexuality: A mixed methods approach. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 39, 599-618.


They work ^_^ Though I'm having trouble finding where it mentions asexuality in Encyclopedia of Identity so I didn't put a link for that one yet. There was another source I took out because it turned out it completely mixed up attraction with arousal.


it seems to be the definition all though unliked by a few..generally works and is easily identifiable

where it goes wrong is when we add..but..or spectrum

we do have some definitions existing already..the most obvious is wikipedia and the urban dictionary

as to the recognised dictionaries..well soem we have to work on and i feel that's very much what the pt should be doing

example..collins concise english dictionary is used by most schoolss in the uk but it lists asexual as

1. having no apparent sex or sex organs,

2. (of reproduction) not involving sexual activity,
◇ adv asexually


it's places like the major dictionary providers the pt should be corresponding with to ensure the definitions are changed or updated


Which is why I did a quick search. Don't know how recognized some of these are but I'm gonna look into them some more.
As for the whole spectrum thing, I think it's too complicated to throw into a dictionary.
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#18 Raccoons & Arca N.H.

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 08:43 PM

Merriam-Webster Online has a page on How does a word get into a Merriam-Webster dictionary?

Damn, I was going to mention that one. XD

I'm not sure how others do it. Such as, the Oxford Dictionary. I'd assume that they have a similar system?
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#19 Faelights

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 10:39 PM


Merriam-Webster Online has a page on How does a word get into a Merriam-Webster dictionary?

Damn, I was going to mention that one. XD

I'm not sure how others do it. Such as, the Oxford Dictionary. I'd assume that they have a similar system?

Arca, Andrew posted the guidelines for the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) in the same post you just quoted. :P



EDIT: I realized belatedly that you might be referring to other dictionaries published by the Oxford University Press, so I did a search:

On the general Oxford Dictionaries site, it says this in the FAQ

New word suggestions

Details on how to suggest a new word, or contribute new evidence for a word already in the Oxford English Dictionary, are available from the OED website.
We recommend that you read the following section before contacting us:
How do you decide if a new word should go in an Oxford dictionary?
See also other Dictionary FAQs.

Clicking on the suggested topic, "How do you decide if a new word should go in an Oxford dictionary gives the following (spoilered for length):

Spoiler


That link under the spoiler to "other FAQs about dictionaries" seems like it could be relevant as well. There's a lovely link there to an infograph about how a word can get into the Oxford Dictionaries.

#20 Jillianimal

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 05:14 AM



Merriam-Webster Online has a page on How does a word get into a Merriam-Webster dictionary?

Damn, I was going to mention that one. XD

I'm not sure how others do it. Such as, the Oxford Dictionary. I'd assume that they have a similar system?

Arca, Andrew posted the guidelines for the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) in the same post you just quoted. :P



EDIT: I realized belatedly that you might be referring to other dictionaries published by the Oxford University Press, so I did a search:

On the general Oxford Dictionaries site, it says this in the FAQ

New word suggestions

Details on how to suggest a new word, or contribute new evidence for a word already in the Oxford English Dictionary, are available from the OED website.
We recommend that you read the following section before contacting us:
How do you decide if a new word should go in an Oxford dictionary?
See also other Dictionary FAQs.

Clicking on the suggested topic, "How do you decide if a new word should go in an Oxford dictionary gives the following (spoilered for length):

Spoiler


That link under the spoiler to "other FAQs about dictionaries" seems like it could be relevant as well. There's a lovely link there to an infograph about how a word can get into the Oxford Dictionaries.


We're in there, sort of. Asexual is defined as "a person who has no sexual feelings or desires".

American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Macmillan Dictionary, MedTerms.com & Medical dictionary added this definition too.

Should we leave it as is?
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#21 Faelights

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 05:16 AM

We're in there, sort of. Asexual is defined as "a person who has no sexual feelings or desires".
Should we leave it as is?

I'm inclined to say we shouldn't leave it as is... because that just sounds like a nonlibidoist. o.o

#22 Ace Amoeba

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 05:23 AM

That's pretty true and the fact that they already have a description of what they think we are, we have a leg up on that particular dictionary.

Jillianimal, you we're asking for help in another thread and I got you covered.

#23 Jillianimal

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 05:31 AM


We're in there, sort of. Asexual is defined as "a person who has no sexual feelings or desires".
Should we leave it as is?

I'm inclined to say we shouldn't leave it as is... because that just sounds like a nonlibidoist. o.o


Should we try adding nonlibidost as well? I don't think we'll have nearly as much sources for it to go through, but I could be wrong.
"No, my friend. We are lunatics from the hospital up the highway, psycho-ceramics, the cracked pots of mankind. Would you like me to decipher a Rorschach for you? No? You must hurry on? Ah, he's gone. Pity." ~ Dale Harding (One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest [the best book evah])

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#24 Jillianimal

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 05:40 AM

Jillianimal, you we're asking for help in another thread and I got you covered.


Thanks Ace ^_^ :cake: I noticed you posted before, but I figured the more people were aware of this idea, the more eyes we'll have open for more possibilities. Also I wouldn't be surprised if there were some people around here who've tried getting a word or 2 in the dictionary before & may be more familiar with what they're really looking for.
"No, my friend. We are lunatics from the hospital up the highway, psycho-ceramics, the cracked pots of mankind. Would you like me to decipher a Rorschach for you? No? You must hurry on? Ah, he's gone. Pity." ~ Dale Harding (One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest [the best book evah])

Posted Image I am a machine. No longer living, just a shell of what I dream.Posted Image

#25 Avery_N_Co

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 06:59 AM

The Merriam-Webster Dictionary Online requires these fields to submit a word.

New Word *

Definition *
A sexual orientation where one does not feel sexual attraction
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EXAMPLE SENTENCE
Please tell us how you've heard this word used
The word is used to describe a sexual orientation
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We should think and word it carefully.

#26 Jillianimal

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 04:16 PM

The Merriam-Webster Dictionary Online requires these fields to submit a word.

New Word *

Definition *
A sexual orientation where one does not feel sexual attraction
Part of Speech
noun verb adjective adverb abbreviation interjection other
Topic
select anatomy business food language music people physical and mental conditions popular culture sports style technology and Internet transportation weather miscellaneous
EXAMPLE SENTENCE
Please tell us how you've heard this word used
The word is used to describe a sexual orientation
If your example sentence is quoted from a media source (print publication, broadcast, Web site), please add the following details:

Author's Name

Source

Publication Date


We should think and word it carefully.


While that description works, I think it would be better to specify "A sexual orientation where one does not feel sexual attraction to anyone" since a lot of people think of arousal & attraction as one in the same.


On a side note, I'm going to do a quick little side project of adding Romantic Orientation to urban dictionary since I don't think we'll get that into anything major. I think it deserves more recognition. It seems like we talk about it as if asexuals are the only ones with a romantic orientation but I want to make it clear that this something that can be applied to all other sexual orientations & the 2 don't always add up for people.

I'm at school now waiting to be picked up but I'll try to get gist of it here (I had it worded better in my head before):

One's pattern of romantic attraction (overwhelming, nervous-but-euphoric feeling that often leaves one inclined to pursue a romantic [though not necessarily sexual] relationship) toward others. Though it tends to coincide with a person's sexual orientation for many people, the 2 don't always overlap (ex: heteroromantic homosexual, aromantic pansexual, etc). Romantic orientations are identical in principle with sexual orientation & are often seen in the form of:

heteroromantic - romantic attraction toward opposite sex
homoromantic - romantic attraction toward same sex
biromantic - romantic attraction toward both sexes
panromantic - romantic attraction toward someone regardless of sex/gender identity
aromantic - romantic attraction toward neither sex


I think I'll do the same sort of description with sexual orientation, but with sexual attraction obviously. Any suggetions before I submit to UD?
"No, my friend. We are lunatics from the hospital up the highway, psycho-ceramics, the cracked pots of mankind. Would you like me to decipher a Rorschach for you? No? You must hurry on? Ah, he's gone. Pity." ~ Dale Harding (One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest [the best book evah])

Posted Image I am a machine. No longer living, just a shell of what I dream.Posted Image

#27 5_♦♣

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Posted 29 December 2011 - 12:23 AM

The Oxford dictionary I got for Christmas defines Asexual as lacking sexuality.

Granted, not exactly the greatest definition, but at least it's not defined as being incapable of getting aroused so something similar.

For cars she couldn't care less. Fastidious and precise-Queen.  

 

"Without death all we have are random events, accumlation. You can't call that life"-CC.

 

Also known as: 5DC, 5, DC, DCC, Diamond(s), Club(s), CC, C2, CCCD, CD, CoD, 5d, 5oD, Clubsie, Clubbles.

 

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