• Announcements

    • Kelly

      New Team members Needed--Moderator, Project Team, and Declass Team: Voting   12/10/13

      See:   http://www.asexuality.org/en/topic/164659-new-declass-team-member-needed-voting/   http://www.asexuality.org/en/topic/164657-new-moderator-member-needed-qa-co-mod-and-world-watch-mod-voting/   http://www.asexuality.org/en/topic/164656-new-project-team-member-needed-resources-and-education-director-voting/  
    • Kelly

      AVENues Holiday Special Edition is now live   08/17/17

      The new edition of AVENues is done!   See:        
    • Lady Girl

      Ace Community Census   11/06/17

      It’s time for the 2017 Ace Community Census!   see:   http://www.asexuality.org/en/topic/162675-announcing-the-2017-ace-community-census/  
    • Heart

      Help fund AVEN's servers!   11/06/17

      AVEN is doing its annual fundraiser to raise donations for server costs! See http://www.asexuality.org/en/topic/163251-aven-server-fundraiser/ for more details.  
Telecaster68

Brain scans hint why fantasising about sex gives better orgasms than mechanically doing the physical actions.....

Recommended Posts

Telecaster68

According to this study, some parts of the brain are more stimulated by thinking about erotic touch than actually doing it yourself.

 

In particular, it might be an indication that as we sexuals have said over and over, sex with someone else is qualitatively different to masturbation. The researchers speculate that thinking about touching yourself is going to work on mirror neurons, especially since the women were thinking about someone else using a dildo on them. The research doesn't go into that, but the full paper mentions that other studies have found that women who imagine sex more vividly have more sexual pleasure. That could account for different brain areas being affected than a simple physical stimulus-response.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
swirl_of_blue

Would be interesting to read the whole article, but *insert grumbling about greedy Elsevier and paywalls and non-open science here*. But about what OP wrote about imagination and thinking of sex, at least for me the idea of orgasm being mostly "inside your head" is nothing new. It's like EVERY article, from stupid clickbait to sex guide to actually sensible information states several times that (especially for women ) "the brain is the biggest sex organ". Even I, as a person who doesn't like partnered sex, would say that orgasm is maybe 5-10% physical and the rest is inside my head. But I guess that for me partnered sex and masturbation were almost reversed compared to sexuals: partnered sex was all about physical stimulation, and masturbation is about feeling free to express thoughts and emotions and fantasies, and a partner and their body would just get in the way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Telecaster68
Quote

I guess that for me partnered sex and masturbation were almost reversed compared to sexuals: partnered sex was all about physical stimulation, and masturbation is about feeling free to express thoughts and emotions and fantasies, and a partner and their body would just get in the way

Makes perfect sense, really, as a variety of asexuality. Maybe the presence of someone else would overwhelm the part of the brain that both actual sex and imagined sex affects (since it's the same part, per neural mirroring). With no one else there, it won't be overwhelmed. This would be a very different experience than the 'scratching an itch' variety of masturbation that a lot of asexuals report, and to extend that idea, could be why under some circumstances - like when you're comfortable enough with a partner that they're no longer overwhelming - you can enjoy partnered sex (if that's the case). If there's no mirroring going on, the only pleasure would be the simple stimulus-response stuff (which how what my wife describes the sexual pleasure she had, when she still had it).

 

You're right that the research confirms the popular truism, as research so often does... in a way, it can't be otherwise. We only experience things our brain process, after all. The research is just using fMRI to say sexual stimulation can physically affect the brain in different ways.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Laurann
5 minutes ago, swirl_of_blue said:

Would be interesting to read the whole article, but *insert grumbling about greedy Elsevier and paywalls and non-open science here*.

*insert agreement on that grumbling about paywalls and non-open science*

I can get access to it via my university's online library. I'll send it to you in a pm. I don't want to be sued so I won't post it here, but anyone else who wants it can pm me.

 

I'm not all that interested and haven't read it, so I won't comment anything else that's useful :3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Laurann
13 minutes ago, Telecaster68 said:

I was just engaged in the same kind of thing...

 

There's this one too - same researchers, similar subject. I think I may have conflated the two, a bit.

I can access that one too. Will you offer this one, or should I? :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Telecaster68

Well if you're already there.... I'm on my tablet now so it's actually even more awkward. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Laurann
20 minutes ago, Telecaster68 said:

Well if you're already there.... I'm on my tablet now so it's actually even more awkward. 

I'll start screenshotting :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FictoVore.

I'm weird in that basic physical stimulation does less than nothing for me, haha. If I'm masturbating myself, I can't feel anything at all unless I imagine graphic, extremely taboo sexual situations (that other faceless people are involved in). I've never actually felt anything from being stimulated by another person in any way (other than pain and discomfort) but now that I know more about my body and what I can desire and enjoy sexually, I'd be able to find ways to enjoy partnered sex that don't involve being physically stimulated by the other person (and it would only work if my brain was 100% engaged). For me it's a matter of no brain no gain, haha :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ChillaKilla

TMI warning



I find this to be true, even while engaging in sexual activities. If I fantasize, especially about certain fetishes of mine, it's so much easier and quicker to finish, as opposed to relying on sensation alone. I sometimes have insecurities about whether that makes me a bad partner... like, shouldn't the person I'm with be enough? But that's irrational nonsense, I know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kaysir

Sucks that I can't think about it and do it at the same time, haha. I can read the second one, I'll give it a skim for now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
borkfork

In other news, water is wet. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Telecaster68

To most people it's blindingly obvious, I agree, but it frequently seems that  sex being more than a physical sensation is new information to a lot of asexuals and they find it hard to believe, hence posting the peer reviewed paper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Philip027
Quote

In other news, water is wet. 

Shrug, it's news to me.  Not sure why people would put so much of an emphasis on the Real Thing if "fantasies" consistently provided a better experience.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Telecaster68

Fantasies while masturbating are better than not fantasising, not better than actual sex. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Philip027

I thought the topic was comparing fantasies to the real thing, though >_>  I'm confused.

 

I don't experience fantasies though (I'm too down to earth, I guess) so maybe that's why this is confusing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FictoVore.
16 hours ago, Philip027 said:

I thought the topic was comparing fantasies to the real thing, though >_>  I'm confused.

 

I don't experience fantasies though (I'm too down to earth, I guess) so maybe that's why this is confusing.

Unless I read wrong, I'm pretty sure the topic is about fantasies making masturbation more pleasurable for many people than when they masturbate without fantasizing. So if they masturbate while keeping their mind totally blank, the experience isn't nearly as pleasurable, they may take ages to orgasm, and the orgasm won't be as pleasurable (compared to if they masturbate while fantasizing about a person/sexual scenario/feet/whatever gets them off ) which is why people often say things like 'the mind is the most sexual organ' etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Snao Cone

Beyond making it more pleasurable, it speeds things up. I find that very helpful, as I want to get to the end point much more than enjoy the way there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FictoVore.
3 hours ago, Snaocula said:

Beyond making it more pleasurable, it speeds things up. I find that very helpful, as I want to get to the end point much more than enjoy the way there.

Yep same here - I want to get it over as fast as possible and it would literally never get done unless I imagine extremely violent taboo situations haha! It literally just won't work unless I engage my brain D:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now